Any Rapid Shape/Straumann 3D printer users out there?

T

tyjthomas

Member
Full Member
Messages
64
Reaction score
1
I wanted to get other user’s opinion of the Rapid Shape Printer. I was leaning towards purchasing an Asiga 3D printer, but as I’ve researched Rapid Shape D30+ (Straumann rebranded as p30+) it seems like a better printer and more complete streamlined workflow. The printer has 2x the accuracy, still is open source 385 nm DLP, automatic separation of the prints from the buildplates, larger build plate, and wash and cure units all communicate together wirelessly for which settings to use. The wash will do the dirty and clean wash on its own and the cure does its curing under vacuum - all of this making for a simple, straight forward, quick, and clean processing. With the better accuracy and open source and easier processing, it seems like a no-brainer as a whole workflow. However, it seems there are so many people with Asiga’s attesting to their quality…wondering if I am missing anything.

I want to make removable dies, models and everything else that goes with the 3D printers. I’ve had the Formlabs 3B and its been a bit frustrating…

Just wondering if anyone else had the Rapid Shape or Straumann 3D printers and what their experience has been or if they had wished they had gone with another printer brand, like Asiga.

Also any way to compare the speed of printing of the two?
 
Last edited:
Brett Hansen CDT

Brett Hansen CDT

Well-Known Member
Full Member
Messages
1,188
Reaction score
102
Anything that Straumann is part of in regards to dental laboratories should be looked at with a healthy dose of skepticism.
 
LuthorCorp

LuthorCorp

Active Member
Full Member
Messages
468
Reaction score
29
I wanted to get other user’s opinion of the Rapid Shape Printer. I was leaning towards purchasing an Asiga 3D printer, but as I’ve researched Rapid Shape D30+ (Straumann rebranded as p30+) it seems like a better printer and more complete streamlined workflow. The printer has 2x the accuracy, still is open source 385 nm DLP, automatic separation of the prints from the buildplates, larger build plate, and wash and cure units all communicate together wirelessly for which settings to use. The wash will do the dirty and clean wash on its own and the cure does its curing under vacuum - all of this making for a simple, straight forward, quick, and clean processing. With the better accuracy and open source and easier processing, it seems like a no-brainer as a whole workflow. However, it seems there are so many people with Asiga’s attesting to their quality…wondering if I am missing anything.

I want to make removable dies, models and everything else that goes with the 3D printers. I’ve had the Formlabs 3B and its been a bit frustrating…

Just wondering if anyone else had the Rapid Shape or Straumann 3D printers and what their experience has been or if they had wished they had gone with another printer brand, like Asiga.

Also any way to compare the speed of printing of the two?
We have been using the D40II from Rapidshape for over a year and a half now its so far its been working really well. We use it for splints primarily but also did a few batches of removable models. The speed is really good especially if you compare it to FormLabs which unless you crank the step count it takes forever to print anything.

We print a full tray of 16 nightguard orientated in a vertical axis and it takes around 5 to 6 hours to print. Similarly a printed model in a horizontal orientation takes around 2 hours or so, this is all dependent on how thick you make the models.
 
T

tyjthomas

Member
Full Member
Messages
64
Reaction score
1
We have been using the D40II from Rapidshape for over a year and a half now its so far its been working really well. We use it for splints primarily but also did a few batches of removable models. The speed is really good especially if you compare it to FormLabs which unless you crank the step count it takes forever to print anything.

We print a full tray of 16 nightguard orientated in a vertical axis and it takes around 5 to 6 hours to print. Similarly a printed model in a horizontal orientation takes around 2 hours or so, this is all dependent on how thick you make the models.
Thanks for the feedback. Have you done any removable dies with it?
 
T

Treavor

New Member
Full Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
We have a P40 and a Carbon Printer. Its accuracy is equal to the carbon printer. Also, print time is equal to carbon. We print models. We specifically tested the analog fit against the carbon and it fits great. The only 2 minor downsides compared to the carbon are cleaning the build plate between prints which you may not have to actually clean between every print if you are constantly running, but we were told it was recommended. The other is the software. But that depends on what you want to do with it. The carbon software is straightforward and geared towards simplicity. Netshape is a robust software that may be intimidating. It is a good printer and we have not had issues with it breaking. We have had it for a year now. Straumann's support has been good when we needed help with calibration or anything along those lines. I do not know anything about Aisga except I think they are one of the printers you can print Dentsply digital denture. If that is something you are considering it may be something to think about.
 
T

tyjthomas

Member
Full Member
Messages
64
Reaction score
1
We have a P40 and a Carbon Printer. Its accuracy is equal to the carbon printer. Also, print time is equal to carbon. We print models. We specifically tested the analog fit against the carbon and it fits great. The only 2 minor downsides compared to the carbon are cleaning the build plate between prints which you may not have to actually clean between every print if you are constantly running, but we were told it was recommended. The other is the software. But that depends on what you want to do with it. The carbon software is straightforward and geared towards simplicity. Netshape is a robust software that may be intimidating. It is a good printer and we have not had issues with it breaking. We have had it for a year now. Straumann's support has been good when we needed help with calibration or anything along those lines. I do not know anything about Aisga except I think they are one of the printers you can print Dentsply digital denture. If that is something you are considering it may be something to think about.
Thank you very much for sharing!! I really appreciate the feedback. The little I’ve heard has compared it to Carbon printers as well.

You’re correct on the Lucitone 199. Asiga prints them now. Was hoping I might be able to possibly configure it to print that as well or maybe it would be a future available material. What resins do you use? Are you only using the Straumann resins?

Also I know you have to change out the IPA wash cups. How much IPA does it hold/go through?

Is NetFab hard to learn? I’m trying to see if I can find a demo trial or something.
 
LuthorCorp

LuthorCorp

Active Member
Full Member
Messages
468
Reaction score
29
Thanks for the feedback. Have you done any removable dies with it?
We have done a few with good results, but it takes more work with the settings to make sure you make appropriate models.
 
T

Treavor

New Member
Full Member
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Thank you very much for sharing!! I really appreciate the feedback. The little I’ve heard has compared it to Carbon printers as well.

You’re correct on the Lucitone 199. Asiga prints them now. Was hoping I might be able to possibly configure it to print that as well or maybe it would be a future available material. What resins do you use? Are you only using the Straumann resins?

Also I know you have to change out the IPA wash cups. How much IPA does it hold/go through?

Is NetFab hard to learn? I’m trying to see if I can find a demo trial or something.
We only use Straumann materials in the printer. We do not use wash cups. We use what the carbon came with to clean the models so I am not sure how much the Straumann alone would use.
NetFab is not hard to learn. They will walk you through everything you need to know. It just takes some time to get comfortable with anything new. And if you have a question you can call customer support and they will walk you through it. That's what we did in the beginning.
 
K

Kasern_The_IT_guy

New Member
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
At the lab I'm supporting, we've had issues with both the FormLabs (Don't remember the model name) and the Asiga MAX UV. The formlabs one, we decided to just get rid of as it constantly caused production stops and we never got any good customer service/support, we had to disassemble the entire machine just because two little specs of dust got inside of the machine and obscured the mirrors... (it probably took us about four hours to disassemble, clean and assemble again).

THe Asigas though.... Their in their own categories of funn stuff... They usually just stops once every 2-4 weeks and needs to be seviced for two hours to get it recalibrated in an try and fail situations.... When it needs calibration, it also often punctures the resin tub or contaminates the resin so that we have to pour out like a 100$ worth of resin and just drain it.....

We usually print almost non stop from 7AM to 4PM or if it is nessecary even loger or all night in our peek periodes.

So, yeah both have their drawbacks.... I belive we've ordered an SprintRay to test out as we need to expand our 3D Printer facilites.
 
T

tyjthomas

Member
Full Member
Messages
64
Reaction score
1
Thanks again for all your feedback. I ended up going with the Rapid Shape D30+ (Straumann rebranded as p30+). I have several reasons but their post processing workflow seems to be really top notch and thought out well. Will keep you all posted.
 
tehnik

tehnik

Active Member
Full Member
Messages
314
Reaction score
12
THe Asigas though.... Their in their own categories of funn stuff... They usually just stops once every 2-4 weeks and needs to be seviced for two hours to get it recalibrated in an try and fail situations.... When it needs calibration, it also often punctures the resin tub or contaminates the resin so that we have to pour out like a 100$ worth of resin and just drain it.....
That is actually a weird statement. What exactly needs calibrating with asiga once every 2-4 weeks? I have been using max UV non stop for 2 years without any of the described problems. Also when you puncture the tray, it is always user error. I can name a few things, that cause this, but it can happen with every single printer, that uses films. You can actually filter the used resin and use it again. Also what resin are you using, that you have in the small tray 100$ worth of it? Something, that cost over 1000 for a litre?
 
J

Jussi Roivanen

Member
Full Member
Messages
42
Reaction score
9
What ever printer you choose, remember that physics when liquifiying/hardening plastics revolves heavily around temperatures. Operating temperatures (of materials) are crucial: temperature controlled "build box" or "tray" is must to have.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom