This may be my last thread.

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LarryRDC

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<<Im sorry for missing something if youve already elaborated, but what printer did you get? Learning curve?>>

One other thing with the "learning curve" is post processing parts. It can be a PITA and messy, no matter what printer have.....
 
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GarryB

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Im embarrassed to not know some things, but Ive got the balls to ask.
Printed models. You need model builder software, a printer, cure unit, and Im sure some other things Im not up to speed on, and they all cost money. In the end, no matter if you use stone or technology, you still have a model.

Here we go. Why not pour an impression with model resin?

Not sure if Im way off track here...there are 4 pages of replies to this and to be honest I quickly skimmed through them.

You can get a pourable resin to pour directly into your impression (self curing, no light needed). We use this when we have hard bite splints to make to avoid breaking teeth when we remove them from the model (often happens on stone models).

Again, apologies if I have misunderstood the OP's question.
 
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sidesh0wb0b

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Not sure if Im way off track here...there are 4 pages of replies to this and to be honest I quickly skimmed through them.

You can get a pourable resin to pour directly into your impression (self curing, no light needed). We use this when we have hard bite splints to make to avoid breaking teeth when we remove them from the model (often happens on stone models).

Again, apologies if I have misunderstood the OP's question.
which pourable resin do you use?
 
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FASTFNGR

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Im embarrassed to not know some things, but Ive got the balls to ask.
Printed models. You need model builder software, a printer, cure unit, and Im sure some other things Im not up to speed on, and they all cost money. In the end, no matter if you use stone or technology, you still have a model.

Here we go. Why not pour an impression with model resin?
Leave all aside, if you get a digital file, how do you even get a model? In order for Drs to give a good impression, they went digital, which means unless you have a 3D printer you can not even have a model.
 
Affinity

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Not everyone is getting IOS scans, my docs that have a cerec make their own crowns and send me impressions for cosmetic work and bridges. Ive told them they can send digital impressions, for years, but they dont. I would like to see a legit stat that says how many offices take digital impressions, Im willing to bet its the minority at the moment, but of course that can change in a years time..
 
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Leave all aside, if you get a digital file, how do you even get a model? In order for Drs to give a good impression, they went digital, which means unless you have a 3D printer you can not even have a model.
I get a lot of digital work. I order models from iTero for anteriors, model free for posteriors. The Drs I work with realize its not getting better results...they still take a PVS when they deem the case 'important'.
 
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Al2

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Building a digital lab is a totally different beast than an analog lab. The problem with most dental labs trying to get into digital dentistry is that they think they can pull someone off the street and teach them how to design a crown in a couple of hours and then they are shocked when things start to go south on them. Also they have a porcelain tech grind, stain and glaze the crowns, thus negating the benefit of going digital. A weekend warrior tech is the Achilles heal of digital dentistry. Yeah they can design crowns, but you are going to be doing a LOT of finish work. I have worked in several places and trained under some very good technicians (both digital and analog) and have just celebrated the first anniversary of my own dental lab.
I work solo and so I don't have the time for failures. I am able to easily scan, design, finish and glaze 10-12 crowns a day. The trick is that you have to print models and mill your own crowns. Also I use Katana Zirconia so for 95% of cases I don't have to worry about staining them. The only problem with that is that you need a large stock of zirconia on hand. I get on average 23 units per disc. I have doctors comment on how they look better than the emax crowns they used to get from their other labs. Waxing and pressing Emax used to be my forte. No more!
I buy Sierra Tools for my mill and only buy diamond. The burrs are $145 each but the last time I switched them out I had done over 900 crowns on the set, making the cost per unit on burrs to be around 35 cents. Printing models to check the contacts is also something I do and I have gotten the resin cost per model down to $.50. I do about 95% of my finish work while the zirconia is it's green state using Matrix Shapers I get from Henry Schein. Those are AWESOME, I trim sprues and thin margins. Just don't buy the green and white ones. They are green and I think a medium grit. The green and white ones include a fine white tip to them and they each cost as much as 5 of the green burs (around $35) and I have not found any benefit in using the fine tool on my crowns.
I am fully digital and lower my cost to dentists while still maintaining a good profit margin. I did a full lab costing for my business and have added the price of everything into my crowns down to the garbage bag that I replace every other week. I am able to have a significantly lower price than other labs in the area and still maintain a good profit. I also have a 3 day turnaround on my crowns which is very attractive to dentists. I could easily triple my output if I could find another tech who is trained well in digital design.
Hi Scott B, i hope everything is well, im looking to open my own digital dental lab, however, i need to build up a price list. everything you have described in this post i have done at my old JOB, im looking to have competitive prices that are fair for the lab. any suggestions i would deeply appreciate, thanks in advance
 
rkm rdt

rkm rdt

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Why would you want someone else set your fees?
 
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charles007

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This thread that Bob "user name" started is one of the most interesting threads I've read on DLN. Don't know how I overlooked this thread and regret I didn't see this while Bob was still with us. Bob will always be in our hearts when on dln. I hope Bob's friends and other members will continue adding to this important thread. I would almost call this thread required reading for the digital believer crowd. ;)
 
Affinity

Affinity

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AI2, The best way to get a pricelist together is to ask the client what they are looking for. Doesnt have to be a dollar amount. These are long term relationships, so start it by serving your client and asking what they need, expect, and what they get now. Its good to negotiate these contracts up front so that there is no confusion down the road by either party, including terms and conditions, warrantys, materials used, etc..
 
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JMN

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@Affinity nailed it Myagi style with one blow. I have at least 4 pricelists and that's before office special adjustments.

Fees are the same on all of them for some things, but each office is different amd will have different desires and expecrations. They aren't monolithuc so wht should yoy be?
 
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