Bone reduction guide - 3shape

A

aclavicka

Member
Full Member
Does anyone know if it is possible to do a bone reduction guide with just the 3shape Implant studio? Or any simple work arounds? If no, what is the best software system for doing this?
Thanks all
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

Beanosavedmysociallife
Full Member
No idea about 3shape implant studio, but GuideMia has a pretty easy bone reduction guide process.
 
Sevan P

Sevan P

Well-Known Member
Full Member
Yes it is but not a legitimate way basically a work around. I think this is something in the upcoming newer versions.
 
Car 54

Car 54

Well-Known Member
Donator
Full Member
Why are we as techs now planning bone reduction? At what point are we playing Dr without their education?

I know they ultimately have the final word on it, and thus the liability and responsibility, so maybe that is of some comfort.
I also know I've kinda gone through this in another thread as far as us planning implant placements and am okay with it,
but now bone reduction? I guess we send an image to the surgeon or the Dr and say here's what I'm concerned with, what do you
think, and treatment plan it together.
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

Beanosavedmysociallife
Full Member
Why are we as techs now planning bone reduction? At what point are we playing Dr without their education?

I know they ultimately have the final word on it, and thus the liability and responsibility, so maybe that is of some comfort.
I also know I've kinda gone through this in another thread as far as us planning implant placements and am okay with it,
but now bone reduction? I guess we send an image to the surgeon or the Dr and say here's what I'm concerned with, what do you
think, and treatment plan it together.
@Car 54 Your last sentence is the heart of it.

Bone reduction goes against most everything we have been taught about the importance of bone and it's conservation.
I/we try to avoid significant reduction of bone since in most cases we fight so hard to keep it or restore it with varied rates of success.
At times it is necessary for the better longevity of the implants and restoration and other times it is necessary for aesthetic reasons if the
transition between the prosthetic and what is left of the maxillary alveolar process will be visible in the aesthetic zone.

Competent technicians with long experience in restoring full arch/mouth restorations are more than qualified to determine what is "aesthetic"
and where bone reduction would be beneficial regarding aesthetics. It is most certainly up to the clinicians and ultimately the surgeon if this
solution is viable and in the best interest of the patient in their specific situation anatomically speaking.

Collaboration between all participants in the process of restoring a patient is important. Each bringing a different set of special skills and
experience to the table. Team work is in the best interest of the patient. We as technician's are not planning the bone reduction, but merely
suggesting where it would work best from our experiences fabricating prosthetics. Just more data for the clinician/surgeon to use in determining
what is the best method for a specific situation.
 
JMN

JMN

Christian Member
Staff member
Full Member
Why are we as techs now planning bone reduction? At what point are we playing Dr without their education?
I'm coming more and more to the belief that their "education" might as well come out of a Cracker Jack box. The real difference is they can get state permission to do this stuff and they can get insurance to do this stuff. And that's what scares me.

Something is wrong with this field when we're planning surgery. It is that simple. In what other field of medicine would someone other than the knife holder decide what to cut, drill, pin, secure...
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

Beanosavedmysociallife
Full Member
I'm coming more and more to the belief that their "education" might as well come out of a Cracker Jack box. The real difference is they can get state permission to do this stuff and they can get insurance to do this stuff. And that's what scares me.

Something is wrong with this field when we're planning surgery. It is that simple. In what other field of medicine would someone other than the knife holder decide what to cut, drill, pin, secure...
You are looking at it as though you are making these determinations. This isn't the case in my experience.

I get casts, face bow, photos, x-rays/CT with a list of patient needs and desires. At times I get a rough TX plan of proposed implant positions and other times this will be determined once a digital workup is done. Using digital information we are able to better visualize the final prosthetic and the clinicians may determine from that what the best treatment options are and forge a plan.

Not all clinicians are incompetent dolts who are barely able to prep a tooth or take an decent impression or scan. Some have great leadership skills and know how to use every team member's strengths to find amazing solutions to difficult problems.
 
Car 54

Car 54

Well-Known Member
Donator
Full Member
@Car 54 Your last sentence is the heart of it.

Bone reduction goes against most everything we have been taught about the importance of bone and it's conservation.
I/we try to avoid significant reduction of bone since in most cases we fight so hard to keep it or restore it with varied rates of success.
At times it is necessary for the better longevity of the implants and restoration and other times it is necessary for aesthetic reasons if the
transition between the prosthetic and what is left of the maxillary alveolar process will be visible in the aesthetic zone.

Competent technicians with long experience in restoring full arch/mouth restorations are more than qualified to determine what is "aesthetic"
and where bone reduction would be beneficial regarding aesthetics. It is most certainly up to the clinicians and ultimately the surgeon if this
solution is viable and in the best interest of the patient in their specific situation anatomically speaking.

Collaboration between all participants in the process of restoring a patient is important. Each bringing a different set of special skills and
experience to the table. Team work is in the best interest of the patient. We as technician's are not planning the bone reduction, but merely
suggesting where it would work best from our experiences fabricating prosthetics. Just more data for the clinician/surgeon to use in determining
what is the best method for a specific situation.
As always with you, a thoughtful and insightful reply, thank you 2th for letting me work it out in my post, and for your follow up :)
I was thinking about you and others after I posted, and your 2nd paragraph is where there is that difference in the type of work
that I do, and the next tier or two above me techs with their knowledge and skills in the more advanced work you all do.
 
Car 54

Car 54

Well-Known Member
Donator
Full Member
I'm coming more and more to the belief that their "education" might as well come out of a Cracker Jack box. The real difference is they can get state permission to do this stuff and they can get insurance to do this stuff. And that's what scares me.

Something is wrong with this field when we're planning surgery. It is that simple. In what other field of medicine would someone other than the knife holder decide what to cut, drill, pin, secure...
Thank you also for understanding my first blush of where I was coming from. and maybe that we go to far? But, it sounds like something where it is
a team approach, and the back and forth communication with the Dr and the surgeon before a flap is made or a hole is punched.
With where technology is going, it can be just a part of doing business for those labs that have the knowledge and experience?

Now, it's time to get back to over cooking zirconia, something more up my ally and of where I'm at :)
 
Last edited:
JMN

JMN

Christian Member
Staff member
Full Member
You are looking at it as though you are making these determinations. This isn't the case in my experience.

I get casts, face bow, photos, x-rays/CT with a list of patient needs and desires. At times I get a rough TX plan of proposed implant positions and other times this will be determined once a digital workup is done. Using digital information we are able to better visualize the final prosthetic and the clinicians may determine from that what the best treatment options are and forge a plan.

Not all clinicians are incompetent dolts who are barely able to prep a tooth or take an decent impression or scan. Some have great leadership skills and know how to use every team member's strengths to find amazing solutions to difficult problems.
Thank you for yanking me back to reality. There are amazing dentists out there.
 
D

DrG

Member
Full Member
I'm coming more and more to the belief that their "education" might as well come out of a Cracker Jack box. The real difference is they can get state permission to do this stuff and they can get insurance to do this stuff. And that's what scares me.

Something is wrong with this field when we're planning surgery. It is that simple. In what other field of medicine would someone other than the knife holder decide what to cut, drill, pin, secure...
I recommend you work with specialists only. Problem solved.
 
Blenderfordental

Blenderfordental

New Member
Donator
Full Member
Does anyone know if it is possible to do a bone reduction guide with just the 3shape Implant studio? Or any simple work arounds? If no, what is the best software system for doing this?
Thanks all
The Guide Designer is able to do a bone reduction guide. This is one of the add-ons for Blender 2.81.
 
Guest Room
Help Users
  • No one is chatting at the moment.
  • Chat Bot:
    Room has been pruned!
    Chat Bot: Room has been pruned!
    Top Bottom