If you had one implant planning software what would it be?

D

dandyfop

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Hello,

I've been dragging my feet for way too long on producing surgical guides. I can an Asiga Max and the resin to make the guide, but I don't have software.

I've looked a blue sky bio and done some training on it, but I don't like how there aren't any presets for different implant systems. I would need to know the exact sizes of the drills and the keys and all that.

3shape implant studio seems more intuitive but $$$$

Codiagnostix?

Also is it hard to order the guide tubes one at a time?

If you can to have only one do everything software what would you choose?

Thanks a lot!
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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For now until some others make some changes. Guide Mia. A little dated (Win95 theme) on the interface, but really powerful. More capable than you would probably ever fully use. Most everything needed is automatic regarding factory surgical guides, drill length stops, drill sleeve diameters, etc. The developer is the owner, is the software engineer, is the the support. Reasonably priced. I've had great service and support.
It is customizable and fully open which most others can't say.
Look into it. They have demo version you can try before investing. Well thought out in many ways. The developer is brilliant.
I've done a few hundred plans at least with this software in the last year or so to include dual scan, bone reduction and other complex multistage surgeries.
 
D

dandyfop

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Hey 2thm8kr, I've followed a lot of your posts. If this is the one you use, I'll take it seriously. Thanks!

at $3500 US its an easier pill to swallow than the 3shape one.
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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Hey 2thm8kr, I've followed a lot of your posts. If this is the one you use, I'll take it seriously. Thanks!

at $3500 US its an easier pill to swallow than the 3shape one.
I've used several different planning softwares. This one is the most open. I didn't find it really intuitive when I started using it, but I can now navigate it and figure out most things on my own. You get online training with the developer via T.V. and support for at least a year.
Try the demo before committing it is the same as the licensed version.
 
DESS-USA

DESS-USA

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what about what exocad offers also cybermed is another company and dentiq out of korea
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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what about what exocad offers also cybermed is another company and dentiq out of korea
exoplan is still beta. Doing sample cases with some of the same ones I am planning in GuideMia and comparing positioning. It has the best 3d rendering and views of any implant software I have used or demoed. exocad matching algorithm second to none. Still needs some more libraries so waiting on some implant companies to step up.
Will be a heavyweight contender when approved here.
 
D

dandyfop

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I think I may wait until exoplan before I decide. Should be coming out in Canada with a week or two I hear.
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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I think I may wait until exoplan before I decide. Should be coming out in Canada with a week or two I hear.
If you are not in a hurry and can wait to get into the planning game, that would ve a wide choice. It's pretty awesome in a lot of ways yet it is a young software and will need some refinement. There are a lot of bright beta testers involved. exocad is the type of company that really listens to what end users want/need and implements it as fast as they can introduce a stable version. If the implant companies would get off their duff and get some libraries together this could move along a bit faster. The implants I use most have fully guided libraries and it is a super smooth transition from beginning to end with my workflow.
Now if the FDA would just get to it........
 
D

dandyfop

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Man, I was just playing around with 3shape implant studio. Super slick and it seems to have a lot of implant systems. Any big downsides to sticking with 3shape? (I am fully hooked on the 3shape crack)
 
lcmlabforum

lcmlabforum

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They have a site in Ukraine and Australia it seems
LCM
 
D

dandyfop

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I think I'm going to stick with 3shape. With all the kits it makes me feel way more confident. Though man, has anyone really thought of the whole business model?

7k software. $400/kg resin. 14k printer (okay I use it for models everyday too). Click fee. Sleeve fee. Setting up a consult with the dentist. Huge implications in case you make an error. big labs selling them for $300. That's like 1.5x the price of a no brainer monolithic zirconia molar. I am never seeing a ROI.

I feel like I'm doing it just for fun, or for personal interest. Has anyone made this into a profitable part of their business? Or is it just a loss leader to increase implant restorations?
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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I don't think single tooth guides are profitable in the wallet sense, but it leads to a lot of other avenues. Lot's of lower cost software options and outsource solutions. Generic sleeves and sleeveless guides.
Definitely get more work out it. Done enough with my client's that for simple cases it is usually just me and the surgeon consulting. Digital work up, plan the case, get it approved by the surgeon, fab the guide. Not a huge money maker, but for me more education, stronger client relationships, better teamwork, something to be gained here. Imo
Plus I can mostly blame myself for poorly placed implants that come into my lab now.
 
Manny Ramirez

Manny Ramirez

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2thm8kr my hats to you man. You seem to get the whole picture and where this whole industry is going. The world is going digital, and although doctors can learn how to create a guides, design and mill and crown "same day" (most of the time is next day). Doctors are better off spending time in front of the patient's mouth because that where the real money is for them. It is going to take a whole new generation of dental technicians to think out of the box, hone in their skills, and step up to the plate. You are a more valuable resource to them when take on this chores for them.
 
G

grantoz

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i think dandyfop that if you are not a dentist you shouldnt be designing guides printing and making them for a dentist yes but deffinately not designing them.we have been part of surgical study groups etc for years everytime i think yes lets design there will be one little bit of anatomy i didnt see or something i didnt consider and then bam we could be injuring or doing worse to the patient.i know the signing off on the design approach but in court you will still have to defend it as you will be the one who on paper is unqualified.
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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Yes, keep rubbing two sticks instead of using a lighter. Less chance of an explosion.
 
Car 54

Car 54

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i think dandyfop that if you are not a dentist you shouldnt be designing guides printing and making them for a dentist yes but deffinately not designing them.we have been part of surgical study groups etc for years everytime i think yes lets design there will be one little bit of anatomy i didnt see or something i didnt consider and then bam we could be injuring or doing worse to the patient.i know the signing off on the design approach but in court you will still have to defend it as you will be the one who on paper is unqualified.
grantoz, in a way, kinda along with what you're saying, I've been thinking who are techs compared to the dentist or oral surgeon in "telling them' where to place our implants.

Yet, after having read this thread, and with all of the good points that were presented, made me rethink my position. I'm not telling the oral surgeon, or the general dentist "this is it", period (my guide and the implant site position) but they have the right of refusal, or to modify the site position.

I am not part of a study club, and I admire your doing that. It's something I need to get out of my comfort zone and start attending one, somewhere.

I guess with our planning software, chances are I would take a snapshot or two of implant site position, and of the restorative position to send along with the guide
to the Dr drilling the site(s) as helpful visual information of what and why I did what I did.

With multiple implant sites being planned, I can see our part in buying the software (in my case, Implant Studio$$) and designing, yet for 1-3 units, isn't a wax up with a suck down enough? I know it's a bit of a guess, especially on lowers as far as the bone and angle of the bone etc in where I position my crown in the "ideal spot", but at least it lets the surgeon or dentist see where my ideal position of the where I want our crown(s) to be, in relation to the adjacent teeth.
 
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