Epoxy die material and Ivocap

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EricH

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Hi, everyone. I have a new case waiting on me that introduces a conundrum. I haven't seen it yet, but it's a partial frame that has cast-in attachment receptacles that mate to a bridge with Xpdent VS3 attachments. I've never seen these, but the Dr. says they don't make analogs for the attachments, and they told him to use epoxy to pour the impression and make the cylindrical attachments integral to the model.

Does anyone have experience with these? I've never used epoxy die material, so any recommendations are welcome. Also, how do these epoxy materials, or resin reinforced die stones as far as that goes, work with Ivocap? I wonder if they bond with the acrylic, and what to do about that. Thanks for any suggestions you can give me!
 
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FASTFNGR

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Hi, everyone. I have a new case waiting on me that introduces a conundrum. I haven't seen it yet, but it's a partial frame that has cast-in attachment receptacles that mate to a bridge with Xpdent VS3 attachments. I've never seen these, but the Dr. says they don't make analogs for the attachments, and they told him to use epoxy to pour the impression and make the cylindrical attachments integral to the model.

Does anyone have experience with these? I've never used epoxy die material, so any recommendations are welcome. Also, how do these epoxy materials, or resin reinforced die stones as far as that goes, work with Ivocap? I wonder if they bond with the acrylic, and what to do about that. Thanks for any suggestions you can give me!
Use Epoxy like cold cure not a big difference. Power and liquid. You can use acrylic also instead.
 
JKraver

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Epoxy or resin reinforced die stone models will likely bond during ivocap processing. Ivoclar does not recommend it. Call Xpdent yourself and ask for attachments. You never know.

I would pour it in die stone, then accurately dupe in whatever normal denture stone you use, then I would scan master and design partial in exocad or have it designed for me by my frame lab.
I would block out attachments with putty before final processing, and cross my fingers
 
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Dentalmike

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Old school idea. Use a brush to capture delicate areas with pattern resin and connect a dowel pin to that with resin for retention also to then pour full model in stone. Not sure what to say about processing but one way to get your model.
 
Jo Chen

Jo Chen

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The VS3 is a vertical hader bar. Preat makes a metal hader bar analog. Maybe you could cut a pice to the right length and use that making the model
 
Doris A

Doris A

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I agree with all of the above.
 
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EricH

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Thanks for all the suggestions! I appreciate the ideas. I'll see what I have around here that might work.
 
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ztech

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Hi, everyone. I have a new case waiting on me that introduces a conundrum. I haven't seen it yet, but it's a partial frame that has cast-in attachment receptacles that mate to a bridge with Xpdent VS3 attachments. I've never seen these, but the Dr. says they don't make analogs for the attachments, and they told him to use epoxy to pour the impression and make the cylindrical attachments integral to the model.

Does anyone have experience with these? I've never used epoxy die material, so any recommendations are welcome. Also, how do these epoxy materials, or resin reinforced die stones as far as that goes, work with Ivocap? I wonder if they bond with the acrylic, and what to do about that. Thanks for any suggestions you can give me!
Not advising on the use of epoxy, just wanted to give you a material option if you need to go that way. Alpha Die MF is a material that I use to make models on tiny preps. It's virtually indestructible once it hardens. It's pour characteristics is like water, and reproduces the fine details. Good luck
 
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EricH

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Thanks ztech for the material recommendation. I'm a little slow to respond because our phone/internet has been out for several days. Just getting caught up on stuff :).
 
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