What's this abutment for?

Adi

Adi

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#1
When do we need to use this abutment?
The hexagon area is not hexed , it's cylindrical.


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Adi

Adi

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#3
Why not use hexed abutments ? Or non hexed?

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2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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#4
Isn't that a non-hexed abutment?
Hexed abutments are not used on screw retained bridge work.
For one, you would never get the bridge to seat. Getting implants placed with perfect
path of draw would be a miracle. With or without a guide.
 
Adi

Adi

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#5
Isn't that a non-hexed abutment?
Hexed abutments are not used on screw retained bridge work.
For one, you would never get the bridge to seat. Getting implants placed with perfect
path of draw would be a miracle. With or without a guide.
I thought a non-hexed is the one with no hex at all ( only a ring )!!

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JMN

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#7
When do we need to use this abutment?
The hexagon area is not hexed , it's cylindrical.


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It is a non-engaging abutment as there is no anti-rotational component to the seating area.

It looks like a plastic of some type, so they probably made it have the circular ring that protrudes into the implant to provide some more strength to keep from splitting/breaking the interface area it if the screw is over-torqued.

What system is this from? Not one I'm familiar with.
 
G

grantoz

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#8
the ring just helps it locate at the time placement it does nothing else if it was to provide anti rotation or any kind of lateral movement the bridge would not seat as it would have to touch the sides of the implant closely which is impossible unless the implants are perfectly parallel .as it stands if you have a big difference in the angles for that implant system you still may need to trim the casting a.bit on the cylinder. i would do that before investing as you wouldnt get a passive path of insertion on extreme angles. i have had the same conversation with a couple of clients they just dont seem to get it.one has informed me that both bio horizons and biomet 3i are wrong in their design as i have used original parts from both companies which dont engage the inside of the implant.
 
Adi

Adi

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#9
It is a non-engaging abutment as there is no anti-rotational component to the seating area.

It looks like a plastic of some type, so they probably made it have the circular ring that protrudes into the implant to provide some more strength to keep from splitting/breaking the interface area it if the screw is over-torqued.

What system is this from? Not one I'm familiar with.
It's Spanish.
Ok, so when do we need to use the non-engaging abutment?


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JMN

JMN

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#10
It's Spanish.
Ok, so when do we need to use the non-engaging abutment?


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A non-engaging abutment is used whenever there are multiple implant or abutment sites being restored with and being connected by the one prostetic assembly.

scenario
edetulous pt
implants at/near 2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 14
Dr wants implant bridge 2-8 and 9-14. Bridge to have the abutments and crowns as one piece, not separate abutments and the seat crowns on them. That is, he wants it screw retained instead of cemented/bonded.

You are joining three implant sites with each bridge. Non engaging is indicated so the path of insertion is not insanity inducing. The engaging part is the anti-rotational component that keeps the whole abutment from rotating which would loosen the screw. The other implants, being multiple sites on one restoration, keep a bridge, or even two crowns as one piece on two abutments(splinted) from rotating. If you are being required to make a bridge with one natural tooth and an implant as the abutments, a terrible idea but not always your call, and doc wants the implant screw retained the implant should probably be non-engaging for the same path of insertion issues as multiple implant sites being restored with screw retained prosthesis.

With engaging abutments the angle of all three implants would likely have to be less than .5 degrees from them all being perfectly parallel to get the bridge to seat.
That ain't gonna happen. As @2thm8kr and @grantoz were pointing out.

If you were doing separate abutments for the sites and then seating a bridge on the abutments as if they were normal preps, you would use engaging abutments since each abutment is not prevented from individually rotating by being joined one to another.

If that didn't come out clearly enough, feel free to ask specifically about what was unclear and I'll try differently.

This may help. Dontknow
https://dentallabnetwork.com/forums/resources/implant-primer.12/
 
Last edited:
zero_zero

zero_zero

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#11
the ring just helps it locate at the time placement it does nothing else
That ring is also there to provide lateral support to the screw, increases the connection strength for radial loads...at least, that's what I heard from some "expert" with bunch o' titles after his name.
 
KentPWalton

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#13
Why not use hexed abutments ? Or non hexed?

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You would never get the bridge to seat on a screw retained with a hexed abutment. The implants would have to be perfectly parallel and I have not seen any perfectly parallel in my years of lab work. Anyone else? You could have one hexed and the other non-hexed and it would work still with let's say just 2 abutments.
 
CoolHandLuke

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#14
it is plastic, meaning it can be cast in the material of choice. you wax to it, trim it, or use it to pick up the locations in an impression. in your case, wax to it and cast.

now, if you have to cast a bridge in this you can get undercuts, and thats not a good thing when there are bits that extend into the implant interface. so this piece exists for you to choose how much to engage; because in some cases that bit that extends into the implant can be beneficial, and in other cases it would be inhibitor to seating your prosthetic. so being plastic you can trim it.

make sense ?
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

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#15
A non-engaging abutment is used whenever there are multiple implant or abutment sites being restored with and being connected by the one prostetic assembly.

scenario
edetulous pt
implants at/near 2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 14
Dr wants implant bridge 2-8 and 9-14. Bridge to have the abutments and crowns as one piece, not separate abutments and the seat crowns on them. That is, he wants it screw retained instead of cemented/bonded.

You are joining three implant sites with each bridge. Non engaging is indicated so the path of insertion is not insanity inducing. The engaging part is the anti-rotational component that keeps the whole abutment from rotating which would loosen the screw. The other implants, being multiple sites on one restoration, keep a bridge, or even two crowns as one piece on two abutments(splinted) from rotating. If you are being required to make a bridge with one natural tooth and an implant as the abutments, a terrible idea but not always your call, and doc wants the implant screw retained the implant should probably be non-engaging for the same path of insertion issues as multiple implant sites being restored with screw retained prosthesis.

With engaging abutments the angle of all three implants would likely have to be less than .5 degrees from them all being perfectly parallel to get the bridge to seat.
That ain't gonna happen. As @2thm8kr and @grantoz were pointing out.

If you were doing separate abutments for the sites and then seating a bridge on the abutments as if they were normal preps, you would use engaging abutments since each abutment is not prevented from individually rotating by being joined one to another.

If that didn't come out clearly enough, feel free to ask specifically about what was unclear and I'll try differently.

This may help. Dontknow
https://dentallabnetwork.com/forums/resources/implant-primer.12/
have you had a chance to review the newest version of the Primer?
 
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