Wear your gloves when handling Monomer!

If you never looked at the long term effects of handling monomer, you better read this.

Short version:
It is easily absorbed by your skin
It can cause:

Peripheral Neruopathy (can't feel with your fingers and nerve pain)
Nerve damage generally (mylein sheath disorders(that's the insulator on the 'conductor' of your nerves))
A few other things like we'd expect Liver, Kidney damage. Nose/mouth/lung issues.
 
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Comments

Denturepropgh
Yeah, I noticed it was outdated. I tried to send Ansell a message on their website, but as soon as I click send, the screen flashes and it doesn't seem to send. I think double-gloving untextured nitrile gloves should do the trick, most repairs I do take 10 minutes or less. Better than just going at it bare-handed. But it is a damn shame that there is not enough clarity on how to protect ourselves. Eff it, I'm calling OSHA y'all.
 
JMN
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Yeah, I noticed it was outdated. I tried to send Ansell a message on their website, but as soon as I click send, the screen flashes and it doesn't seem to send. I think double-gloving untextured nitrile gloves should do the trick, most repairs I do take 10 minutes or less. Better than just going at it bare-handed. But it is a damn shame that there is not enough clarity on how to protect ourselves. Eff it, I'm calling OSHA y'all.
Call the Compliance Dept. NOT enforcement. :)
 
Affinity
I had no idea monomer went thru nitrile gloves.. thats good to know. But are we failing to mention the residual monomer thats going in the patients face??
+1 digi dentures...
 
I
If you're allergic. You gotta work around it. I know (knew) lotta denture guys in their 80's... that drank. And smoked. And fought... And are (were) healthy as can be. It's in the genes.... as for residual monomer in dentures... please read above statement...
 
J
I had no idea monomer went thru nitrile gloves.. thats good to know. But are we failing to mention the residual monomer thats going in the patients face??
+1 digi dentures...
This thread is about work gloves and monomer. Residual monomer is an important issue, but does not need to be discussed here.

About single and double gloves, I have heard that they could actually be worse as the monomer permeates both gloves and encapsulates inside them. I don't have any link to prove this though, but for example, when I was studying to be a DT, this was instructed at our lectures.
 
Denturepropgh
Today I have been corresponding with the OSHA compliance assistance specialist of my region about this issue. He has sent my information to the region tech support for their research and review. So they'll get back to me. During my own research today, I came across a pretty unique glove that is only 5 mil thick made of butyl rubber that you just rinse and reuse. Here's the link https://www.mdsassociates.com/catalog/p-105209/guardian-butyl-5-mil-gloves. The only thing that I still don't like is the curved hand style opposed to a more "surgical" hand style. I'll contact MDS tomorrow because they say that a surgical fitted option is available. I just can't find them on the site. I will also ask if these specific gloves have been tested with methyl methacrylate in the laboratory setting to determine their breakthrough/permeation rate pertaining to MMA. Rinse and reuse seems too good to be true. Here is some more information from MDS about butyl rubber gloves. https://www.mdsassociates.com/guardian-butyl-gloves
 
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Denturepropgh
Got this response from Osha. They didn't want to endorse any particular products obviously, but they gave me another really good lead. Gonna do a little bit more digging. Hopefully I can find the appropriate glove after all of this.

Below is the response provided to us from our Regional Tech support group. Charles, it is important to note OSHA cannot promote or endorse a specific product for use. The below links are for your informational use only.



Below are links to NIH chemical information and case studies. The requestor may find value in reviewing.



https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Methyl-methacrylate#section=OSHA-Standards

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/source/hsdb/195

https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/source/hsdb/195#section=Human-Toxicity-Excerpts-(Complete)



Below are some links to products that were marketed to the dental industry: Understand the below links are for your informational use only – OSHA is not promoting, recommending or endorsing the product information that may be found in these links.



https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/-Aifan-Dental-disposable-butyl-rubber_60305906279.html?fullFirstScreen=true

https://www.flinnsci.ca/gloves-butyl-rubber/ap7482/



You may wish to refer him to the IGA as well.



http://internationalgloveassociation.org/



Charles, hopefully this information can assist you. In addition, you may want to call the manufacturer of the chemical to see if they have any additional insight for handling their product in the manner you use it.



Thank You for your inquiry
 
J
From links above:
Under static conditions, latex and vinyl clinical gloves became permeable to methacrylate monomer (MMA) in a very short amount of time. Neoprene industrial gloves remained impervious for 25 minutes. Dentists and dental technicians should be aware of the toxic effects of MMA and understand that clinical gloves do not afford protection from MMA.

Neoprene industrial gloves are too clumsy (and would be disposable after 25min) to work with and that does not mention nitrile gloves... There are Neoprene surgical gloves, but I didn't find if they are permeable by methacrylate.
 
I
Hou'boutdis'--- JUST DON'T GET OR PUT IT ON YOUR FRIGGIN' HANDS?!? Do you spill gas on your hands when putting it in your car??? Apply the same concept here.
 
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JMN
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Hou'boutdis'--- JUST DON'T GET OR PUT IT ON YOUR FRIGGIN' HANDS?!? Do you spill gas on your hands when putting it in your car??? Apply the same concept here.
It is pretty straightfoward. I started this thread as many of us were taught to reline and pack barehand.
 
J
How do you pack dentures without touching them with your hands? Traditional packing i mean, not Ivobase etc...
 
J
Exactly. And if monomer penetrates through gloves and makes it worse than not wearing them, what would be the correct way to pack?

We do relines etc with those silicone tips, which are great, but packing is difficult without touching monomer...
 
JMN
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Exactly. And if monomer penetrates through gloves and makes it worse than not wearing them, what would be the correct way to pack?

We do relines etc with those silicone tips, which are great, but packing is difficult without touching monomer...
How long dies it take yo get through the glove. You wear the gloves for 20 minutes I cannot imagine it is possibly worse than barehanded. Wear them all day you might might get me to agree.
 
Doris A
I agree with JMN. My first boss many years ago was allergic to acrylic. Monomer or polymer didn’t bother him, mix the two together and he was highly allergic. He wore gloves when he was teaching me to pack and he never had a problem, so it must take it a while to penetrate the gloves.
 
I
How do you pack dentures without touching them with your hands? Traditional packing i mean, not Ivobase etc...
Why are you even here.. Are you looking to pick a fight? Use common sense. Use a fume hood (maybe that's your problem),do not dip ur fingers, shower, bathe, etc. in LIQUID monomer... Wear your glove or not when doing the dirty deed and WASH HANDS THOROUGHLY WITH SOAP AND WATER AFTER THE JOB IS COMPLETED.
 
Denturepropgh
I don't think jeppe is trying to pick a fight, just a valid question as far as I'm concerned. Just today, I have received a reply from Albert Tomechko from Guardian Manufacturing (they make gloves and have a chemist on staff). I am super-interested in these 5-mil reusable butyl rubber gloves that they offer. Here's what he said in regards to use of butyl rubber:

The thinnest glove tested was a 20mil glove- that breakthrough time was 85mins. That being said, a 5mil or 7mil glove would probably not be the best glove to use as the breakthrough time would be far too fast – depending on exposure to chemical. There should be little to no degradation of the glove.

Per our chemist – “If they could use a 14 mil, that might give 30 minutes breakthrough protection. For reusing the glove, I recommend wiping it dry, and then dry it more, maybe at 70 C for at least 4 hours, or at lower temperature overnight. There shouldn’t be any degradation concern.”

Let us know if you have any follow up questions sir.

Thank you –

Albert Tomechko

Eastern Region Sales Manager

Cell: (567)- 224-4197

Methods to Disinfect Gloves: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/disinfecting-gloves-20-diving-albert-tomechko/
 
Denturepropgh
So I would use 20 mil butyl rubber gloves if you are going to be in intimate contact with acrylic dough. That will protect you for 1 hr and 20 min or so. But I HATE using thick-ass rubber gloves when packing. I'm asking Albert if we can use the 5-mil butyl rubber with a pair of nitrile gloves underneath. But that would probably only protect us for maybe 10-15 minutes (which would be good for repairs/acrylic pours but not for conventional packing)

If I was conventionally packing dentures, and really concerned about monomer absorption through my skin I would wear the 20 mil gloves, but even more importantly, try to use a metal spatula to carry the acrylic from the mixing jar to the mould, limiting my exposure to the chemicals. It's tough to protect ourselves correctly when we often are working in a high-production environment. I wish there was a 2 mil surgical fit glove that would protect us indefinitely, but we aren't there yet technology wise. This has been an interesting and exhausting topic so far!
 
J
Sorry for a little late reply, but as Denturepropgh said, I'm really not here to pick a fight. I'm trying to point out that there really are no real answers. There are researches that say monomer passes through any glove within seconds and encapsulates inside them, making glove use worse than not using them. Then there are researches pointing at other results. And then there are people who say they know people who do this or that and that is the right way to go.

At the moment I use those silicone brushes for repairs/relines and for packing I use Ansell nitrile gloves that used to have a classification for monomer resistance, but now that has gone missing from their product sheet. Maybe that really tells that even manufacturers don't really have answers or knowledge of their products.

Since monomer absorbs to skin very fast, I don't believe soap and water afterwards really makes a difference though. Sure, for common hygiene especially at times like these, that is a good habit though.

We did some tests some years ago by putting on different gloves and dipping a finder into monomer liquid for a second. After removing glove, the smell was easily noticed on finger tip, we though this was enough to ensure us to avoid using gloves. This was our own testing, not in any way scientific. But that was our way of using common sense :)
 
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