Unconventional Reline Jig Uses

JMN

JMN

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Hey y'all just wanted to pass a few tricks for those who may find them useful. Sorry for the picture quality.

The reline jig is a wonderful tool for much more than just a straightforward reline.

Modify to whatever works best for you, this is what works for me, and we're all different.

I've used it regularly for repairing cast rpds when one of the flanges fractures off.

IMG_20150915_173119.jpg
When the intaglio comes off too, it can be a bear to get things to work well. Using a putty matrix is a joke because you need to access the very areas it covers and it's hard to be positive that there is no deformation and all the pieces have realigned properly.

The best way I've found is to assemble everything and lightly tack it with the smallest imaginable touch of superglue on three places, like a triangle of dots. If it is missing a chunk, wax in a reasonable guess, adding a touch less than is probable so there won't be any pressure/pain generation when seated.

Then pour up a model and put it on the reline jig. Do the antagonist plaster as well to get a full, completely certain status of how it should be on reassembly.

Remove the rpd and dissolve the glue with Zap Z7 Debonder, or just break the glued parts free. Grind out any old acrylic as you would expect at the junction of what will be old and new. Grind out all/any mating material to the frames mesh. Paint a very thin layer of Vaseline on the metal, and any other place, where you don't want the new acrylic to adhere. Apply separator to the model. Prepare the mesh and add Metal Primer.

Mix up some acrylic to dough stage and place it on the model, re-wet with Metal Primer if it is dry. Reassemble the flange components into the reline jig as you settle the rpd into the model with slight pressure to seat. Assemble the jig and proceed as if it were a reline with tightening the jig and cure as directions indicate.

Remove, inspect, grind and polish, QC, disinfect, bill and grin.
IMG_20150915_203454.jpg IMG_20150915_203522.jpg


The other great use I found was when a denture keeps fracturing and the DDS insists that it doesn't need a reline or occlusion adjustment, they'll nearly always ask for 'strengthening'. The primary choice they have is for metal mesh around here. Well that's just dandy. Full coverage metal mesh into a processed denture.

OK Reline jig is your friend again.

Pour and mount on the verticulator just like for a reline, both sides. But take down the model at the peripheral roll to be nearly flat at the height/depth of the roll, leaving about 1 mm of the buccal surface. Just enough to get exactly back to the original shape.
IMG_20151217_194710.jpg

Grind out till there is just a shell of denture and then start molding the mesh into the denture. Use the backside of a brush handle to nudge it into the tighter spots. It should hold form well enough that it has some resistance to being removed.

Put the denture, with the mesh inside, onto the jigged model and gently close the jig partway. This creates a definite bend line on the mesh where the denture stops. Now trim the mesh about 1cm closer to the center of the denture than the bend line.
IMG_20151217_194702.jpg You'll notice I'm not close to perfect either at the 5/6 area.

Apply separator to the model. Wet the inside surface of the denture liberally with monomer, then carefully insert the mesh back into the denture, and paint the mesh with Metal Primer. Full mesh effectively creates a two-piece sandwich with acrylic bread. We want to take every opportunity to make the bread adhere to the lunchmeat mesh. So even if it does 10% of the usual bond strength to use Metal Primer here, it's worth it. Wet the peripheral area just as if it were a reline and continue to process the same way. From here on, it is a reline.
Pack, cure, inspect, grind, polish, QC, disinfect, bill, grin
IMG_20151218_142305.jpg IMG_20151218_142327.jpg IMG_20151218_142339.jpg


So, what else can you do with a reline jig? Whatever you can imagine.

Hope this helps someone.

I'm sure to have made a few errors somewhere, so don't be shy. Like I need to even say that...
 
kcdt

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Thanks. I love to see how techs think.
 
JMN

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Thanks. I love to see how techs think.
It is fun to crawl into another persons mindset and see how they achieve by different methods the same results.
 
JKraver

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So how was that method for adding metal mesh different from a reline? hope you charge more than your reline fee for "stregnthening"
 
JMN

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So how was that method for adding metal mesh different from a reline? hope you charge more than your reline fee for "stregnthening"
Nothing aside from the trick to find the right cut point by it folding at the edge of the model and cutting 1cm back from the fold.

And, yes. Yes, I did :)
 
JKraver

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Nothing aside from the trick to find the right cut point by it folding at the edge of the model and cutting 1cm back from the fold.

And, yes. Yes, I did :)
Oh, so the jig helped with position? I like to tack down my mesh with cold cure before reline. Though with ivobase high impact mesh is pretty useless.
 
Doris A

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Reline jigs are used with the branching technique to let the hydrocast set up some before placing it in the mouth.
 

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