Oil Compressor okay for dental mills ?

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Getoothachopper

Getoothachopper

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My lab is small and I have to share the room with my compressor .So when i'm milling I have to wear headphones. (I generally mill less than two hours a day) I have a couple of jun-Air double head compressors that are sient that I would love to be able to use for milling . I can work around the 15min on 15min off cycle but my concern is the oil vapor and particulates that will get through to the mill. So ,,,,,what could I use to trap the oil that's in the air . Anyone out there who uses oil compressors for the mill . Are these oil traps effective and or a pain to maintain( how often to empty them)?. What type of filters do you use ? Many thanks for any help with this . Jun-Air-12-3.jpg
 
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Oil vapor is present in the moisture, so drying is key.
I use an oil/water separator by Speedaire, then two refrigerated dryers, then two MD-4 desiccant dryers, then an RTi FR500-G filter, then a Ney compressed air filter/dryer.
It matters. You dont want oil on your Zr, and if you have any moisture vapor, your mill will need more cleaning.
With absolute dry air, the dust will suck out into your dust collector much, much better.
This is after milling 5 or 6 crowns.
Set up isnt cheap. For all necessary filters and dryers, Id say 2500? Replace MD-4 filters 2 or 3 times a year, $40 bucks each, plus filters for the suction at least twice a year.
If I were to do it over, Id be running wet mills from @brayks

20200501_170515.jpg
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

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you'll firstly want a secondary tank to act as an Intercooler device. an actual intercooler should be built into most compressors but on small ones not always the case. aftermarket intercoolers are also present on most commercial sized air dryer units. basically cool down the air so that the heat turns into condensate and drips down the sides of the tank to be drained. on big 60+ gallon tanks this makes an intercooler mostly redundant, as the tank itself acts as an intercooler albeit not a great one because most of the heat stays in the tank so you're just getting the major gunk out and leaving the line to cool the air as it gets to your mill. not a fantastic idea.

so either hook up a second tank, or a proper air dryer. this is not a case of 'do both just to be safe' because that is inefficient. the least work is the dryer.
 
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Getoothachopper

Getoothachopper

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Ha Ha , nice ,,,,,belt braces and then another belt ,very thorough.
 
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Getoothachopper

Getoothachopper

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you'll firstly want a secondary tank to act as an Intercooler device. an actual intercooler should be built into most compressors but on small ones not always the case. aftermarket intercoolers are also present on most commercial sized air dryer units. basically cool down the air so that the heat turns into condensate and drips down the sides of the tank to be drained. on big 60+ gallon tanks this makes an intercooler mostly redundant, as the tank itself acts as an intercooler albeit not a great one because most of the heat stays in the tank so you're just getting the major gunk out and leaving the line to cool the air as it gets to your mill. not a fantastic idea.

so either hook up a second tank, or a proper air dryer. this is not a case of 'do both just to be safe' because that is inefficient. the least work is the dryer.
I have a drier and four 12" wilkinson dessicant driers but I was worried about the oil from the compressor ,,,,,,Iv'e always used oilless compressors before .
 
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Getoothachopper

Getoothachopper

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