mission clinic work

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rkycdt

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I recently posted my situation under General Discussion but I'd love to hear from some removable techs regarding one aspect specifically. I am a fixed technician but I was approached by the dental team from a local mission clinic to see if I would be interested in providing them with removable appliances, mostly dentures and flippers. They have in storage most of the necessary equipment which was donated to them from the dental lab program that I graduated from and that shut down a few years ago. I am the only lab in my town outside of an Aspen, but there are two adjacent cities within 30 to 60 miles with plenty of labs.

I am the only technician and I do not have much work so I am looking at learning something new and applying it regardless of what I choose......the other options being to invest in digital equipment to revive my fixed business, or shut down and move onto something else. Is it practical to consider the option of going into dentures? I've gotten a lot of feedback from other fixed technicians, but I'd love to know what the removable community thinks.

I care about the people involved with this and appreciate what they do and would love to see this succeed in my community which has a decent need for it. So, even if I am not their tech, I'd love to help steer them in the right direction. Does anyone here have any experience working with/for grant-funded non-profits like this?
 
Rtyrelw

Rtyrelw

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I think you should go for it. Dentures are a learning curb compared to fixed however there are a lot of things that translate both ways. And there are a lot of things that you will be able to grab from both and apply to the other. It would be good to start with things like flippers and partials and move up to a full denture set up and wax. But there are really good courses. I don't know what teeth you are using or planning on using but vida has a great tooth variousthetic and functional and they have a course with Mark wagoncil who can help learn to do things like full large setups. Contact your Vita rep for more information on that. But in regards to most partial and flipper work is easy simple work that can be done pretty fast. Then after you learn how to do it you could go digital. Once you start making more money off of the thing though. Digital is there but it's still has a lot of things that analog can do the same if not better. So jumping in and investing 30 to $50,000 for something that is maybe not worth it to me.
 

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