Milled Resin Crown VS Printed Crown

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Lamber Tran

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Hi, Everyone. a 3d printer or milling machine, considering the cost, timeliness, and precision, what would you prefer for making a temporary crown or a bridge? and someone told me dental crowns can now be produced more efficiently than traditional milling by using 3D printing, cheaper stronger, and even more accurate. is that true, I really need your advice, thanks in advance!
 
CoolHandLuke

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lies, utter tripe, bollocks, and bullcrap.

printing is bad, except in very specific circumstances, and making temps is not one of them.
 
JKraver

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lies, utter tripe, bollocks, and bullcrap.

printing is bad, except in very specific circumstances, and making temps is not one of them.
Milling is better, but I had a "permanent crown" material made in a form3b that was made into a hybrid and lasted in the mouth for 2+ months.
 
Andrew Priddy

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who makes a good resin for pressing?
 
bigj1972

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Hi, Everyone. a 3d printer or milling machine, considering the cost, timeliness, and precision, what would you prefer for making a temporary crown or a bridge? and someone told me dental crowns can now be produced more efficiently than traditional milling by using 3D printing, cheaper stronger, and even more accurate. is that true, I really need your advice, thanks in advance!

Did that someone happen to look like this?????
Screenshot_20230121_143658_DuckDuckGo.jpg
 
JKraver

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I would be ok with using a 3d printed material for a temp. The issue is, you would need to 3d design the temp, so since you are already doing the work designing to print and then to post process it you could do nearly the same work and deliver the crown. Also an assistant can make a temp in 5-10 min that will be sufficient for the task. How long will it take you to make the temp? 3- 4 hours? Printing, processing, and finishing. Then the if the 3d printed temp happens to be light, you cannot just add to it. Can it be done, sure, but why?
 
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RE: the claim that printed parts are stronger: no way. 3D printed resin is essentially always going to make mechanically-inferior parts compared to something milled from a solid billet; at a microscopic level, cured methacrylate UV resins are porous composites of monomers and oligomers entrapping a large proportion of (depleted, inert, mechanically-useless) photoinitiator. By mass, the resins will always bear a significant proportion of this dead weight photoinitiator material that contributes nothing to the structure mechanically and makes it more spongey than the comparatively-solid mass of interlinked polymer molecules you get with a conventionally-produced bulk material that's then milled to form.
SLA/LCD/DLP printed parts rarely make for good final products, mechanically-speaking, if other processes are available. They're weak, they're UV-unstable and tend to deteriorate rapidly even if post-processed correctly, they're porous and love soaking up water, they're prone to creep under load, etc. I'm generalizing here, but it's a safe series of assumptions for most resins.
Printed parts still offer benefits over milling, though, generally speaking- you can often produce parts dramatically faster, as an entire build plate takes just as long to print as a single part does. They allow geometries that are difficult or impossible to mill, and free designers from many of the strictures you learn to work within for milled parts. 3D printing really shines as an intermediary part of a larger process, that makes good use of 3D printing's significant strengths, while using other processes to avoid its weaknesses. The classic example is printing wax models that are then investment cast- you can produce designs of almost any detail level without worrying about what your mill can do or what tooling you have on hand, and you can print large batches of parts very quickly, then do the actual final product with a process and material that's very robust and reliable.
 
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Foggy_in_RI

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I am not agreeing or disagreeing with the above statement about porosity, strength, etc....

But I also know enough that reading anything on the internet is suspect and even more suspect when there is no data presented.
Again- respect the opinion; but show me the data.
 
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tuyere

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What in particular are you curious about? These are things I've picked up from years of LCD/DLP 3D printing in non-dental industries, I don't know of a good single resource that'll back all this up, else I'd provide it. If there's some particular thing you want to know more about that I mentioned, I can probably dig through my big folder o' white papers and see what I have.
 
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bigj1972

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Well I have an anecdote. My built-in key fob case for my Honda cracked, which is a common occurrence after a few years. So I went to thingiverse, they have 3D models to print another case. So I used specifically the toughest non dental 3d resins made. And after going through 4 or 5 prints, they lasted a week before they broke.

Then I ordered the $6 plastic one off of Amazon and it's lasted for 6 years. That was all the research I needed that they are great for prototyping and I'm sure for some mechanical parts that are not under heavy load. But they are are not impact resistant nor fracture resistant. They have a surface hardness greater than traditional polymers, but so does ice and yet it cracks and breaks.

It lacks the cross-linking at a molecular level that traditional pmma has.
 
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It's funny, I went from trying to directly print functional objects as a hobbyist to only using the printer to make molds and dies for said functional objects- i use a high-temperature resin (Siraya Tech's Sculpt Ultra, rated for continuous 220+ C degrees without damage or deformation) to directly print plastic injection molds and permanent metal-casting molds for low-melting pewter-type alloys. Directly printing functional objects with even 'engineering' resins is usually a recipe for disappointment, but they're an extremely powerful tool for making cheap and easy production tooling that you used to need a machine shop to have any hope of producing.
Dental printing is a very different ball-game than printing for mechanical design, of course, the stuff we make permanent denture teeth out of is worlds more robust than a $50 bottle of 'ABS-like' resin from Amazon. But I'm still highly suspect that directly-printed denture components will have anywhere near the longevity of traditionally-manufactured appliances, it mostly seems like they haven't been around in common use for long enough for that to be put to the test.
 
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I don't know about you guys but dentistry has reached the point that the materials are coming out so fast that there are no long term studies to back up any of the claims made by the manufacturers.

And by the time the studies are done and published there is a new one that is already "better" than the last one.
 
bigj1972

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I don't know about you guys but dentistry has reached the point that the materials are coming out so fast that there are no long term studies to back up any of the claims made by the manufacturers.

And by the time the studies are done and published there is a new one that is already "better" than the last one.
That's the problem, they're coming out fast to get the bucks. They don't care about the long time study, they have a new flowchart of products to sell. All the money making and equipment investing will gloss over the imperfections.
There's an old saying, if a dentist buys a Cerac, he's going to find some crowns to cut.
 
bigj1972

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It's funny, I went from trying to directly print functional objects as a hobbyist to only using the printer to make molds and dies for said functional objects- i use a high-temperature resin (Siraya Tech's Sculpt Ultra, rated for continuous 220+ C degrees without damage or deformation) to directly print plastic injection molds and permanent metal-casting molds for low-melting pewter-type alloys. Directly printing functional objects with even 'engineering' resins is usually a recipe for disappointment, but they're an extremely powerful tool for making cheap and easy production tooling that you used to need a machine shop to have any hope of producing.
Dental printing is a very different ball-game than printing for mechanical design, of course, the stuff we make permanent denture teeth out of is worlds more robust than a $50 bottle of 'ABS-like' resin from Amazon. But I'm still highly suspect that directly-printed denture components will have anywhere near the longevity of traditionally-manufactured appliances, it mostly seems like they haven't been around in common use for long enough for that to be put to the test.
Yeah Siraya Tech Blu and Tenacious was what I used.
 
rkm rdt

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I hear the new Omicron resin isn’t as strong as the first 2 but it can be used in more printers.
You anti printers shouldn’t be allowed on airplanes.
 
bigj1972

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I hear the new Omicron resin isn’t as strong as the first 2 but it can be used in more printers.
You anti printers shouldn’t be allowed on airplanes.
I trusted the science and all I got was this lousy t-shirt.
Screenshot_20230128_073247_DuckDuckGo.jpg
 

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