keystone clear clasp otsoclasp experience

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dr.swapnil pande (MDS)

dr.swapnil pande (MDS)

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#1
does anyone have keystone clear clasp or itsoclasp exeperience are they better that wrought wire clasp or casted cobalt crome clasp ??? what about bonding mechanical or chemical ?? do bonding last long ??
 
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mikemed66

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#2
No there not as strong or durable it's a flexible clasp we all know how long the last

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dr.swapnil pande (MDS)

dr.swapnil pande (MDS)

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#3
No there not as strong or durable it's a flexible clasp we all know how long the last

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thanks for heads up can you suggest any good flexible denture material which can be polished and addition of tooth over it possible afterwords
 
JMN

JMN

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Itsoclear and any other non-pmma material requires mechanical retention, there is no way, anyone has found, to chemically bond nylon/thermoplastics to acrylics, they must have a sharp bend or loop in the nylon/thermoplastic that cannot be pulled out, just like a piece of wrought wire.

I have found Itsoclear to be given to work stress fractures more easily than Flexite's, but they are not as flexible as flexite's either and require a higher temp to adjust which is good for patients that consume hot coffe/tea reglarly. Pick you choice on the situation.

thanks for heads up can you suggest any good flexible denture material which can be polished and addition of tooth over it possible afterwords
Can you please ask this in a different way if my answer is not to what you ask.

Most flexibles are not well suited to additions, without great experience dealing with them, they are very likely to warp from the heat of the addition being melted to them. Some makers say they can be, but it is technique sensitive, and for certainty they must be reflasked and the addition injected. Afterwhich the partial should remain in the flask for hours to allow cooling to room temperature while being held in the correct shape. Otherwise warping will occur. And sometimes does even with this precaution.

I don't currently handle injectable making, but have great success with adding a tooth by:
Taking a ball clasp (20 ga masel) and cutting all but about 1.5 cm of the tail off. Bening the remaining into a loop with the ball sticking out 90 degrees from the loop. Use needle nose pliers to hold it by the loop, heating the ball to glowing. While it's still hot, press the ball into, but not through to the otherside, the RPD at the area whete the tooth is to be added. When it cools, the ball will be captive in the thermoplastic.
Cut away the apical and lingual areas of the denture tooth enough that it can seat in proper occlusion.
Then A:
Drop the tooth in a dish of monomer, After applying separator to the model, seat the rpd and add cold cure acrylic till the tooth area is nearly overflowing. now seat the tooth, the eruption effect normally done by carving the wax may develop nearly by itself from insertion. If it's not right or not where you want, use a small tiped brush dipped in monomer to move/remove the pink acrylic to your desired appearance.

B:
Wax in the buccal aspect and flange as needed to hold the tooth in the desired orientation and as you want the flange to look, with whatever anatomical or extraction covering features you desire. Then remove the wax and fit the tooth back into the putty. Paint the bonding areas of the tooth with monomer or other bonding agent such as Palabond. Settle the putty back onto the rpd and apply seperator to the modle and any thing else you don't want acyrlic on-like the intaglio. Press home the rpd/putty to the model, inject acrylic with a syringe or apply acrylic with the brush technique. This method only works if there is a large gap between the added tooth and the rpd.

Hope that helps some.

Edit: If you need to add a clasp while adding a tooth, just make the origin point inside the area to be filled with acrylic and make a loop for the acrylic to retain mechanincally. It can get crowded in that area with 2 loops, so testfit and bend carefully.
 
dr.swapnil pande (MDS)

dr.swapnil pande (MDS)

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#5
Itsoclear and any other non-pmma material requires mechanical retention, there is no way, anyone has found, to chemically bond nylon/thermoplastics to acrylics, they must have a sharp bend or loop in the nylon/thermoplastic that cannot be pulled out, just like a piece of wrought wire.

I have found Itsoclear to be given to work stress fractures more easily than Flexite's, but they are not as flexible as flexite's either and require a higher temp to adjust which is good for patients that consume hot coffe/tea reglarly. Pick you choice on the situation.



Can you please ask this in a different way if my answer is not to what you ask.

Most flexibles are not well suited to additions, without great experience dealing with them, they are very likely to warp from the heat of the addition being melted to them. Some makers say they can be, but it is technique sensitive, and for certainty they must be reflasked and the addition injected. Afterwhich the partial should remain in the flask for hours to allow cooling to room temperature while being held in the correct shape. Otherwise warping will occur. And sometimes does even with this precaution.

I don't currently handle injectable making, but have great success with adding a tooth by:
Taking a ball clasp (20 ga masel) and cutting all but about 1.5 cm of the tail off. Bening the remaining into a loop with the ball sticking out 90 degrees from the loop. Use needle nose pliers to hold it by the loop, heating the ball to glowing. While it's still hot, press the ball into, but not through to the otherside, the RPD at the area whete the tooth is to be added. When it cools, the ball will be captive in the thermoplastic.
Cut away the apical and lingual areas of the denture tooth enough that it can seat in proper occlusion.
Then A:
Drop the tooth in a dish of monomer, After applying separator to the model, seat the rpd and add cold cure acrylic till the tooth area is nearly overflowing. now seat the tooth, the eruption effect normally done by carving the wax may develop nearly by itself from insertion. If it's not right or not where you want, use a small tiped brush dipped in monomer to move/remove the pink acrylic to your desired appearance.

B:
Wax in the buccal aspect and flange as needed to hold the tooth in the desired orientation and as you want the flange to look, with whatever anatomical or extraction covering features you desire. Then remove the wax and fit the tooth back into the putty. Paint the bonding areas of the tooth with monomer or other bonding agent such as Palabond. Settle the putty back onto the rpd and apply seperator to the modle and any thing else you don't want acyrlic on-like the intaglio. Press home the rpd/putty to the model, inject acrylic with a syringe or apply acrylic with the brush technique. This method only works if there is a large gap between the added tooth and the rpd.

Hope that helps some.

Edit: If you need to add a clasp while adding a tooth, just make the origin point inside the area to be filled with acrylic and make a loop for the acrylic to retain mechanincally. It can get crowded in that area with 2 loops, so testfit and bend carefully.
That's explained very well thanks
 
denturist-student

denturist-student

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#6
I have used them and still have a few left....They are a bit more flexible than nylon clasps and a lot more flexible than chromium cobalt cast clasps. However the people who use them like them because they are not metal....It seems that the metal clasps are losing popularity as people become more and more esthetically conscious. Those I have placed them in like them...Haven't had any breakages yet....Don't bother with the smaller ones for bicuspids just get the molar sizes.....
 
Pat_L

Pat_L

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#7
We're doing some experimenting with the 4C acrylic from Posco Dental. It's a semi flexible acrylic, so there's a chemical bond. It comes in either tubes for injecting or sheets for vacuum forming. You can cut the vacuum form sheets into strips and use a heat gun to mold them into clasps. It's less flexible than the Itsoclear clasps, but with a chemical bond to acrylic, it tends to be a lot less bulky at the juncture we've found. Comes in pink or clear. Neat idea, still seeing if it works well
 
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