Is there a bad zirconia

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Lamber Tran

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I don't understand why people hate Chinese brands so much but frankly speaking, a lot of brands based in the US or Europe are using zirconia powders made in china, even manufacture their products in China(OEM ODM),then double-triple the price when selling in their own market, that's really ridiculous.
 
JMN

JMN

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Average techs are just like any other average consumer. They buy based on the ad campaign instead of the material (haha) facts of the situation.

People rarely buy Maxwell House over Folgers for their own use just because of the flavor profiles.

It's no different in the lab.

When was the last time you saw a full page advertisement in one of the trade publications that had data instead of pretty pictures that didn't even show a tooth to begin with, much less one made using their product(s).

I remember one specifically that had a lady in a flight suit helmet, mouth agape, and not a tooth or even picture of the material.

They might ship zirc, but that's not what they were selling.
 
JMN

JMN

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Biggest thing in any business decisions you must remember when dealing with sales departments.

The difference between most in sales and acting is whether you pay before or after the show
 
npdynamite

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When was the last time you saw a full page advertisement in one of the trade publications that had data instead of pretty pictures that didn't even show a tooth to begin with, much less one made using their product(s).

I remember one specifically that had a lady in a flight suit helmet, mouth agape, and not a tooth or even picture of the material.
Marketing can be pretty awful... it's even worse when you can feel the pointless marketing material working on yourself
 
KingGhidorah

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Yes there is a bad zirc.

You look first at the translucency you want, most likely somewhere from 44 percent to 51 percent. Then you look at the MPA. If two products are the exact same translucency, both are multi layered for example, then the one with the higher MPA wins. I’ve seen 49 percent translucency at 630 MPA all the way to 750 MPA with the exact same parameters of shade and translucency.
 
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sergio204

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The topic of picking a zirconia is a very well worn topic on here and I almost don't want to start another thread about it, but here goes.

I've been scouring dln and occasionally other places for weeks for information on picking zirconia and there is a TON of information. Unfortunately I haven't found that the ton of information is that helpful when the rubber meets the road of actually making the selection. Now I know that sounds like a complaint or a bad thing, but I don't neccesarily think that it is, it seems to me that the Zirconia market has gotten good enough that for the most part there aren't truly "bad" zirconias anymore (I'm sure there are plenty, but I'm mostly refering to the larger more common names)

I get the impression that if I focus in on almost any one zirconia brand and start looking at user experiences with it, you get everything from "it's the best thing ever" to "it's crap don't buy it". Not litterally of course but yall get the point. If I look at marketing and talk to the companies I find that they all have pretty similar offerings with their own spin and you just have to trust their marketing that their way is better, but of course they can't all be better. (but wait, does that mean their marketing isn't 100% true at all times?!)

My impression from that observation is that most if not all of the main brands of zirconia are pretty good if not great and the real decision has more to do with which one happens to work best for that particular lab. The factors determining that being that their particular sintering oven works well with and one that the ceramist finds easy to work with and achieve accurate shades with. Of course both of these factors can be widely varying.

If those factors are in fact the biggest factors determining which zirconia is best for a lab, is there any way to avoid simply getting a bunch of pucks and running a lot of trials to choose a zirconia? and am I wrong and are there some companies producing truly crappy zirconia? If so how would one identify it?

I hope this isn't too broad of an approach to the question, I just wanted to see if anybody has found better way to either choose a zirconia than simply trial and error. Or see if there is any simple way to at least weed out the zircs that you want to avoid. It just seems most of the user experience cases are more anecdotal than conclusive.


Also just because I'm sure it will come up, I am in no way talking about the benefits of transitioning pucks vs. non transitional or 5y vs 4y vs 3y or any of those things. I'm specifically talking about one companies comparable offering to another companies almost identical offering
Chinese Zirconia
 
npdynamite

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Any updates on your choice?
I guess not specifically. But to summarize my conclusion of what to do about choosing. I'd narrow my search to a few brands that have some transparency on the zirconia being used and manufacturing process so that you know what you are getting. Then go over specs and prices (with special care taken with the strength of transitioning pucks) to pick a few things that fit your needs, then do in lab testing to see which you prefer.
 
CatamountRob

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There are no bad zirconias, only bad people.
Oh wait, that’s dogs.
 

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