Interview for All around tech input/advice.

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juliadesigns4u

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Hello everyone Hope your day is going smoothly! I have an interview coming up and haven't been milling in a couple years. Anything I've missed? I'm interviewing as an all around tech which I was a couple years back but now have been chained to a mouse and computer. Anything will help. I know the regular import put in a puck wait for it to be done calculating and send it off. Anything new to millbox? I'm hoping to get this opportunity so I can get back to the swing of things.
Thanks all!!
 
CoolHandLuke

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that is really glossing over the important parts of milling

machine maintenance is pretty key to successful milling. what could cause a machine to fail to calibrate? what could cause chipping and tool breaks?

how can you evaluate the milling output and compare it with the design, i.e. what tools would you use to verify the milled integrity of a part

what are the signs of spindle wear

breaking down milling into "click import, press calculate, wait" is heartbreaking.

knowing one machine intimately is fine on your resume, but anyone who wants to play at being an all-around tech should at least get comfortable knowing in principle that theres a lot more to milling (or printing) than "import, calculate, wait"
 
CoolHandLuke

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if you know the principles of how you operate Millbox, and are a monkey at a monolith when it comes to milling problems, i suppose thats a qualification. i mean you'd fit right in anyway.
 
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juliadesigns4u

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that is really glossing over the important parts of milling

machine maintenance is pretty key to successful milling. what could cause a machine to fail to calibrate? what could cause chipping and tool breaks?

how can you evaluate the milling output and compare it with the design, i.e. what tools would you use to verify the milled integrity of a part

what are the signs of spindle wear

breaking down milling into "click import, press calculate, wait" is heartbreaking.

knowing one machine intimately is fine on your resume, but anyone who wants to play at being an all-around tech should at least get comfortable knowing in principle that theres a lot more to milling (or printing) than "import, calculate, wait"
I trained techs to do that. It's simple and keeps the mills running. Obviously maintenance is a huge part of milling and your right thank you for reminding me of the trials and tribulations. I've never changed a spindle but do know what happens when it needs repairing. When things didn't Mill right I would check the job and make sure I used the right strategy.. if something didn't get milled I would look at simulations. Calibration was easy no problem, did this after every tool change. Let the tools basically run until they reach double the hours. Cleaning the mill. I mean there isn't much else to it. Tool breaks were due to inproper angulation I remember.. If I was worried about it because of the height of the puck or the automatic placement I would change it and then check the simulation to see any problems. I think if anything was above 20+ I would jeopardize a burr. Ugh trying to remember everything. I know I'm leaving things out.. umm the collec (right spelling!?) If it needed tightening it would chip. Open collet close collet. Calibrate. Done. Hope for the best run a crown.
 
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juliadesigns4u

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I can't remember what tool was what diameter. I can't remember what tool did what part. I know the largest tool did the cutting out and the smallest finished the margins. Tools could cause chipping. Carbides we're cheap and usually tried those out first to see if that's the culprit.
 

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