Ill fitting bars

JMN

JMN

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Its not my place of business, otherwise i would. Just trying to help and point people to an accurate milling and design center. Didn't know it was a crime.
Not your place but "we have a brandname mill?"

If you want them to be a sponsor, have someone contact me or Travis by PM. Click conversations above (the envelope next to your name) and we'll be happy to discuss options.
 
Affinity

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Maybe the patient would be willing to pay $1700 for new bars, since they are going in his mouth forever. But this seems like something simple to laser. Probably quicker than reading this thread.
 
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model guy

model guy

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I process cases for a practice in my state that has an in house technician. She does fabulous work but just can’t do heat cure injection so she sends it to me. So they had this bar case that is who knows how old. They inherited this patient. She was going to basically strip it, reset it with new teeth, and send to me to process. The first picture is of the existing and it looks as though it’s seen combat. Just wait for it... 2780ED74-6BAC-4606-B73E-058C4041852D.png

pretty ugly, right? Then she starts stripping acrylic. Go back and look at the #27 area, the acrylic looks solid. No breaks. C6C8807D-4B76-4567-8AFE-7528AB8812A2.png 868C1CB7-499A-4B7B-85D9-DD700569F7F5.png
It looks as though this was cast, somehow broken, and then super glued before being covered in acrylic?!?!? When the acrylic was stripped away it fell apart. Any other guesses as to how this could have broken in the mouth with out fracturing the acrylic?
 
JMN

JMN

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I process cases for a practice in my state that has an in house technician. She does fabulous work but just can’t do heat cure injection so she sends it to me. So they had this bar case that is who knows how old. They inherited this patient. She was going to basically strip it, reset it with new teeth, and send to me to process. The first picture is of the existing and it looks as though it’s seen combat. Just wait for it... View attachment 35271

pretty ugly, right? Then she starts stripping acrylic. Go back and look at the #27 area, the acrylic looks solid. No breaks. View attachment 35272 View attachment 35273
It looks as though this was cast, somehow broken, and then super glued before being covered in acrylic?!?!? When the acrylic was stripped away it fell apart. Any other guesses as to how this could have broken in the mouth with out fracturing the acrylic?
That just makes me hopping mad. If you wanna do crap work, go shovel manure.
 
I

IanE

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Someone said earlier it either fit passively or it doesn't ... Pretty much sums up the situation , In the past I've used a laser welder to bend a bar slightly ( applying heat to one side ) i'm older and wiser now and would never do this again even the slightest amount of torque applied to implant can lead to failure . We check and double check our master models before scanning , including making stone jigs which are tried into the mouth.. I know you dont want to hear it but i would cop the $1700 and rack it up as a learning experience..
 
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JKraver

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We cut and laser welded it. It was passive after that.
 
Beatrice

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I don't understand why you want to cut and laser weld. I mean the whole concept of offering a cad-cam bar to your patient is to have a monobloc bar.

I think many here says why you should restart. Within my company we offer a "mistake warranty" for this exact problem, I prefer to give a discount to you so you can redo the job from beginning and offer the best to your patient than you trying to save a buck and cut and laser weld.

By the way I am not saying that what your offer to your patient will be garbage, just saying there is better, and I am also sure you are doing your best in consideration of your patient and times are hard and at the end of the day you still need to do a living, don't get me wrong I get it. ;)

By the way; why Chrome-Cobalt for your bars and not Titanium?
 
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Darwin Bagley CDT

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The x-ray is for maxillary with 3 implants but the model is lower with 2 implants.
Is this x-ray just a sample from a different case? The framework does not appear to be passive fit.

Darwin

Bar fit.jpg
 
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bigj1972

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most of the techs here work in their garages

the only problem is getting the heat isolated enough to melt the chrome in an isolated spot. you'd need a rapid induction coil to get it pliable.
Or maybe an old fashion Yates & Bryd soldering machine. Laser Weld these jobs slowly to account for heat expansion/contraction.
 
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JKraver

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I don't understand why you want to cut and laser weld. I mean the whole concept of offering a cad-cam bar to your patient is to have a monobloc bar.

I think many here says why you should restart. Within my company we offer a "mistake warranty" for this exact problem, I prefer to give a discount to you so you can redo the job from beginning and offer the best to your patient than you trying to save a buck and cut and laser weld.

By the way I am not saying that what your offer to your patient will be garbage, just saying there is better, and I am also sure you are doing your best in consideration of your patient and times are hard and at the end of the day you still need to do a living, don't get me wrong I get it. ;)

By the way; why Chrome-Cobalt for your bars and not Titanium?
I messed up on the case, I would of 100% preferred to have a monolithic bar. I did not use a milling center that would of fixed my mistake. I did not feel like a repaired bar was a deal breaker on this particular case. Any problems with this case will result in a new bar being made.

I used chrome cobalt because it is a more rigid metal. If you have any information on why Titanium is superior I will listen. I think they are pretty interchangeable.
 
Beatrice

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I messed up on the case, I would of 100% preferred to have a monolithic bar. I did not use a milling center that would of fixed my mistake. I did not feel like a repaired bar was a deal breaker on this particular case. Any problems with this case will result in a new bar being made.

I used chrome cobalt because it is a more rigid metal. If you have any information on why Titanium is superior I will listen. I think they are pretty interchangeable.
I understand ;)

As for Ti vs Co-Cr
Here my standing point

Titanium is lighter and less expensive, for majority of removable I will strongly suggest this one and also for wrap-around
Co-Cr is much more heavy but you will have a better high-shine product, for a montreal bar it a good choice since patient cannot have easy access to clean, being more polish it reduce accumulation of bacteria.

Again, you are pretty right they are mostly interchangeable, but Titanium is less expensive so :)
 
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JKraver

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I understand ;)

As for Ti vs Co-Cr
Here my standing point

Titanium is lighter and less expensive, for majority of removable I will strongly suggest this one and also for wrap-around
Co-Cr is much more heavy but you will have a better high-shine product, for a montreal bar it a good choice since patient cannot have easy access to clean, being more polish it reduce accumulation of bacteria.

Again, you are pretty right they are mostly interchangeable, but Titanium is less expensive so :)
I think the Co-Cr was the same price as the Ti, or possibly a little cheaper. I wanted the wrap around bar to be as rigid as possible as the space allowed. There was some metal intaglio in posterior. It is heavier, but the jaw on a male could easily compensate for it. I didn't think there was much of a difference. I thought the Ti was softer on the mill which I do not own, so care little about the abuse.
 
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