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    FormLab Form 2 vs. Asiga Max

    Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Contraluz, Dec 10, 2017.

    1. Contraluz

      Contraluz Well-Known Member Full Member

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      So, besides the rather big discrepancy in cost, what is the difference in these two printers.

      I want to use it for C&B, mainly. Also for digitally generated wax-up printouts (models).

      Is there an other alternative?

      Thanks in advance,

      M
       
    2. grantoz
      Amused

      grantoz Well-Known Member Full Member

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      ive heard good things about the asiga its faster bigger print area and more reliable i think the liquids ARE CHEAPER ALSO. sorry caps button got stuck
       
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    3. Bryce Hiller
      Blah

      Bryce Hiller Active Member Full Member

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      I have an Asiga Max. If you are wanting to print your C&B (which is what I do. I print all of our wax-ups), I would hands-down go with an Asiga. I wouldn't trust a Form2. They're just not as accurate and efficient (Hence the price gap). I think they're decent for printing models, but they don't even advertise them for printing C&B (at least, that was the case back in March). The Max was specifically engineered for commercial use, and dental labs in particular. With our Asiga Max, I never have any issues whatsoever. No failed prints, no hiccups. The resin is inexpensive, and you can use resin from third parties as well. If you'd feel like talking about the Max, send me a message and I'll give you my number. I highly recommend you stay away from the Form2 for your C&B. You're going to have a lot of headaches. And Envisiontech? Who's that? I can't possibly recommend Asiga enough, and I'm not a salesperson. I just love their product.

      As for technical specs, the Form2 is an SLA laser, and the Asiga is DLP. Basically, the Form2 has a UV laser that has to hit every single point on a layer individually. Whereas the Max uses a digital UV projector, which prints the entire layer at once. This results in more accurate and much faster prints.
       
      Last edited: Dec 11, 2017
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    4. Contraluz

      Contraluz Well-Known Member Full Member

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      Thank you, Bryce, for your detailed answer. I will shoot you a message, later to day.

      M
       
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    5. Polarmolar

      Polarmolar Active Member Full Member

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      What’s the price difference ? Great thead.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
       
    6. Contraluz

      Contraluz Well-Known Member Full Member

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      Not sure about the FormLab, but I think it is in the $3'500 region. The Asiga Max Is about $14'000.

      So, quite a difference...

      M
       
    7. Polarmolar

      Polarmolar Active Member Full Member

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      Formlabs in Canada was about 6k with the starter kit and warranty. I wonder if the Asiga would be almost 20k , which is still cheaper than the Bego printer.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
       
    8. Bryce Hiller
      Blah

      Bryce Hiller Active Member Full Member

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      There's quite a leap in price, but there's also quite a leap in quality and the engineering behind the printer.
       
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    9. harmonylab

      harmonylab Active Member Full Member

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      can confirm. formlabs has been very unreliable for us so far. wouldn't recommend for models even, much less C&B.
       
    10. Robeau
      Busy

      Robeau Member Full Member

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      Thank you for your input. We are needing to to get a printer within the next few weeks. Would like to discuss further with you when you get a chance.
       
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    11. kristian
      Goofy

      kristian Active Member Full Member

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      Form2 success is, to some extent, a lottery. I have one that's producing very good dies, but accuracy falls off to unacceptable on models. I've heard from many who struggle with everything they try to make. And I know some have success with their models too.
       
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    12. rkm rdt

      rkm rdt Well-Known Member Full Member

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      Joining the Formlabs page on facebook has convinced me that I should look elsewhere .
       
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    13. Labwa
      Breezy

      Labwa Active Member Full Member

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      Printing dies and models and expecting the same shrinkage on both is not a good expectation to have. The bigger the parts get the more they shrink. Unfortunately it's a matter of scaling depending on model vs die. The best solution would probably be to print a tray of dies with no scaling then a tray of models with positive scaling to compensate shrinkage. Arches will shrink more at the heel in laid flat. Printing upright may help. Word of warning. Don't take the companies word for accuracy. And don't be fooled. The accuracy will change with most technology out there.
       
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