Fine then...

Flippercentral

Flippercentral

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So I decide that I should buy a digital denture printer, start to study the dply system, have an open mind... I get to the end of the video and wonder how I can offer that and get away with it, I guess it would be good for a temporary or medicaid denture. I'll look at Ivoclar now and see what they have.
 
TheLabGuy

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So I decide that I should buy a digital denture printer, start to study the dply system, have an open mind... I get to the end of the video and wonder how I can offer that and get away with it, I guess it would be good for a temporary or medicaid denture. I'll look at Ivoclar now and see what they have.
Printed dentures are junk in my opinion until they figure out a way to print acrylic. Even an average traditional processed denture looks a thousand times better and don't get me started in form and function. Now as for Ivoclar, they prefer the Milled method and there dentures are much more aesthetic. However, you are looking at 100K to play in that realm by the time you add the scanner, software, milling machine and product/training to do it. I hate to be a buzz kill but anybody telling you different is blowing smoke up your six.
 
rkm rdt

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Printed dentures are junk in my opinion until they figure out a way to print acrylic. Even an average traditional processed denture looks a thousand times better and don't get me started in form and function. Now as for Ivoclar, they prefer the Milled method and there dentures are much more aesthetic. However, you are looking at 100K to play in that realm by the time you add the scanner, software, milling machine and product/training to do it. I hate to be a buzz kill but anybody telling you different is blowing smoke up your six.
Printing models from an IOS and processing conventionally makes more sense.
 
2thm8kr

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Printed are for protityoung and check bites, etc. There are certainly less expensive ways to get into milled dentures than Ivoclar, buy you will still need a scanner and CAD software.
 
user name

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We have a local office advertising same day dentures. This pic is the only clue on their website about the technology being used...

denture.JPG
 
Affinity

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100k? I guess everyone missed the nexdent denture webinar that imagine did. A nexdent printer is around $10k, a scanner can be had, new, for under $5-6k, exocad another $5k. Thats a helluva lot of dentures to make $20k, but youre wasting your time milling denture bases, it probably takes 3-4 hours to mill a denture, then teeth. The chart 3d systems had showed their resin to be stronger than acrylic. Not to mention you can print 5-6x at once, and in probably half the time (and cost) it takes to mill one. The ivoclar puck I bought was $50-60+ I think, not very profitable, not to mention at least 50% waste material.
I think you have the right idea, just keep researching. Just like anything else, you can dip a toe in without jumping in the pool with your clothes on.. Start with a scanner to digitize your models, outsource the rest. There is a market for digital dentures, just like there is for any other crappy denture. Its not an ivocap, but at the end of the day, its still plastic teeth.
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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The chart 3d systems had showed their resin to be stronger than acrylic
Maybe in some parallel dimension.
Printed material may be stronger in some aspects, but it is brittle and porous, not easily repairable. Certainly faster to manufacturer, but the materials are not there yet. Additive manufactured dentures are the future when the materials catch up. Who cares if it takes a few hours to mill a denture or anything else, that's what robots are for? Labor slaves, at least until they revolt. It is still way faster than traditional methods. I'm not just sitting around watching the mill, I have plenty of it her things to keep me occupied while any type of restorations are milling. Milled PMMA is repairable with conventional materials that most labs/dental offices have on hand.
We have several try in prototype Nextdent printed dentures out in the wild, they break. They have been remade a few times while getting a milled denture ready. I know there are guys delivering those, but I couldn't with a clear conscience.
 
Jack_the_dentureman

Jack_the_dentureman

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But why not buy cheapest printer, print and processing with silicone index ? Teeth with dentine colored acrylic - cut back then insisal acrylic and then a base with pink
 
TheLabGuy

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But why not buy cheapest printer, print and processing with silicone index ? Teeth with dentine colored acrylic - cut back then insisal acrylic and then a base with pink
That's another workflow, just like printing the models, duplicating and moving forward the traditional way. I guess I can set and wax faster than most can design a denture with the current software on the market than waiting for a printer is my point.
 
2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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One problem with that method is denture teeth are not a standard size. Card to card the same mold will be different dimensions. I'm sure you can imagine the problems that will cause. There are some standardized tooth molds coming to market for this purpose. The other is you will still have dimensional inaccuracies from the setting acrylic, no matter how careful or good you are at it. Laws of physics and all.
 
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2thm8kr

2thm8kr

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So you think theyre lying to push products or what?
Salesmen never lie or stretch the truth to push products. They only want what's best for you. I'm shocked and appalled you would imply something like that.
 
Affinity

Affinity

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Im appalled that the FDA would approve such a faulty material!Laugh
 
Jack_the_dentureman

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That's another workflow, just like printing the models, duplicating and moving forward the traditional way. I guess I can set and wax faster than most can design a denture with the current software on the market than waiting for a printer is my point.
Yeee, I know that someone can set up faster, especially immediate dentures. I, on the other hand, scan and design much faster, I hate playing with setting some partial, cutting teeth, adjusting in poor conditions. designing is much faster then. and the method I wrote is no different from copying a prosthesis.
now I will be testing a lot from such a cheap printer. do a try in, transparent silicones, reduced frame and composite injection.
I will let you know if it is fit and ok
 
TheLabGuy

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Yeee, I know that someone can set up faster, especially immediate dentures. I, on the other hand, scan and design much faster, I hate playing with setting some partial, cutting teeth, adjusting in poor conditions. designing is much faster then. and the method I wrote is no different from copying a prosthesis.
now I will be testing a lot from such a cheap printer. do a try in, transparent silicones, reduced frame and composite injection.
I will let you know if it is fit and ok
Keep us posted, I'm actually sincerely intrigued with this workflow/pathway.
 
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