CDT cards

CRWNMKR

CRWNMKR

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#1
With another renewal fee hike, I think its time to trash those paper ID cards and get plastic. The paper cards never last a year, it tears and sticks in my wallet. Anybody agree? Dennis
 
hydent

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#2
Or you could just through the piece of s*** in the gabage, not pay the hiked up fee and keep truckin along.
 
kcdt

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#3
A. I know my number by heart, it never changes, so I quit carrying the card around years ago. I have enough trouble controlling the size of my wallet.
B. If the CDT is only about marketing or what its worth to you in dollars and cents... then the benefits are going to be lost on you.

I value mine highly, but its not a money maker and the vast majority of my clients don't have a clue about its existence.

If you like the card, why not just get it laminated?
 
wwcanoer

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#4
in the olden days it was plastic, and the annual sticker was down right fancy compared to today's sticker.......
 
wwcanoer

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#6
if i have a 30 yr pin, what's yours?, and yes a cdt may not mean anything, but i do agree with you, i'm proud to have it :D
 
hydent

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#7
Well mabe if you could just do it by mail more people would do it! to me its not worth the time and money to go here and there to get the ever so valuble cdt label and prove something that I already know. Kudos to you guys for being so proud of your cdt.
 
kcdt

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if i have a 30 yr pin, what's yours?, and yes a cdt may not mean anything, but i do agree with you, i'm proud to have it :D
I'm just a puppy at 13 years.... I remember an old Navy dog that got his early on and the whole thing was done by mail....
 
kcdt

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Well mabe if you could just do it by mail more people would do it! to me its not worth the time and money to go here and there to get the ever so valuble cdt label and prove something that I already know. Kudos to you guys for being so proud of your cdt.
They stopped the by mail stuff because of fraud... the exams being held at a controlled site ensured the integrity of the certificate.
I'm proud of mine because it reflects a commitment to continue learning. One of the values I gained from it was access to prosthodontic societies that had the CDT as a threshold requirement.
It is not an effective marketing tool, and the vast majority of dentists don't know it exists.
But it does have value in that it is a tangible step in how you value yourself. I know many very skilled and successful technicians that don't have one, and that's fine. for me it meant that I view this as a career and a profession (and I don't mean to imply that those without it aren't serious),and sometimes I need to do something concrete to put my feet on that path and keep them there.
besides who doesn't like letters behind their name and an "I love me" wall filled with certificates....
 
hydent

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#10
Perhaps you and others could try to convince me and other techs that think like I do of the benefits of being a cdt, other than it makes you feel good about yourself. Ken already mentioned how it allows him to gain access to prosthodontic societies. Be specific about the pros and cons.
I'm not dead set against the idea of becoming a cdt I'm just not convinced of its benefits. convince me, as I may be somewhat ignorant about the benefits.
 
CYNOSURER

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#11
Here's an old letter I wrote. I don't have the original article that this letter addresses but I think the letter still conveys how I feel about being a CDT...since 1981. You do the math. Marcus Ring was a wonderful asset to our industry who I respected dearly.

March 22, 1991


Marcus Ring, CDT
10201 Grosvenor Place
North Bethesda, no 20852-4613


Dear Marcus,

It was with great interest that I read both your T&T article (with Ms. Stewart's response) and your recent letter addressing the "CDT Status" issue. I completely understand your objection to requiring our "brightest and best" to take the CDT exam. It is an insult to their integrity, ability, and competency. I understand because we have a similar problem here in Tennessee where nearly 50% of the population does not have a high school diploma. It is undignified for me to ask a 26 or 36 year old man if he would mind going back to high school or taking a GED, to prove he is not a moron, just so he can apply for the CDT exam! Hell, if he can fill out the application (without any serious spelling misteaks) that should be enough! Technicians everywhere will applaud your step skipping proposal. Especially the one who recently wrote to T&T opposing the CDT exam because he felt himself better tested by his accounts. He claims that when a dentist buys his work then he has passed the only test necessary! But why should he limit his "accounts” to just dentists. I know our "brightest and best" technicians are more than capable of delivering a better denture than some dentists. Perhaps we should let then skip the indignation of dental school and award them an MBA (Master of Bushwhacking Award). But I digress into sarcasm.

My point is this. I don't know where the CDT program got this "black eye"...this belief that becoming a CDT brings you up (or down) to a specific level of expertise- On the contrary, all it means is that you have passed a point of competency You are capable of doing competent work. Ideally, one achieves this through either formal education and/or a proper OJT program so that, within a reasonable time, one acquires enough knowledge and competency to take the CDT Exam. And I suppose there lies the proverbial "rub" Those with years of experience may feel a little ego bruising having to take this test with a bunch of "new kids". They may feel they are taking a step backwards. This is NOT true. When an, octogenarian goes back to get a high school diploma this does not mean that he has suddenly acquired the necessary knowledge to 'pass" or that he had to "prove" himself to his peers. He has not taken a step backward He has simply picked up a missing step. He does not seek honor! He gives honor...honor to the achievement...honor to the program...honor to those who have gone before him. I wish this were the attitude of our” brightest and best" non-CDT's. I have never heard the NBC say that only CDT's are competent. What they have said is anyone who is truly competent should be able to pass the CDT exam. As for what this level of competency entails, I would just as soon not open that can of worms. I wonder what kind of response you would get if, on graduation day, you asked the DDSs, MDs. MBAs, CPAs, PhDs, etc how competent they are. You should get a resounding. "Damn competent!” But, if you were to ask again ten rears later how competent were they when they graduated. They might say, "In college I earned my degree; in the real world I learned my trade." Competency does not start or stop with achieving CDT status is NOT a beginning...NOT an end...just a step...a step worth taking...a step worth going back for.

So, at what point does a technician achieve another level of competency? This will always be debatable. And yet, I do feel there is a need for some clarification. There is some confusion in the industry as to what CDT does encompass. I have met many doctors who did not know that CDTs were specialized into the various disciplines. To end this confusion that I would support another level of certification, Some type of designation for someone certified in multiple areas. For example. a Crown and Bridge CDT and Ceramics CDT would translate into a MFPT (Master of Fixed Prosthetics Technician). And a Complete Denture CDT and Partial Dentue CDT would achieve an MRPT (Master of Removable Prosthetics Technician). And someone who has garnered all four categories would be a MDPT (Master Dental Prosthetic Technician). But. there again, this could just add to the confusion. I also realize this is not what you seek because it falls within the framework of the CDT program and simply clarifies the status and is not a true upgrade. But I feel it is important that we star the course with CDT. That we continue to upgrade and improve CDT testing, prerequisites, and renewal process. After all, we have come from "send us a sample of your work" to "sit down and show us what you can do' and It has taken a lot of years, work, and money to achieve the recognition that CDT program has today and I would hate to see CDT relegated to an entry level status. Nor do I relish the thought of our industry starting a "paper chase" for credentials.Those who are the "brightest and best" in our industry will continue to be recognized for their work and their professionalism. I implore you not to cast aside the CDT status as if it were something holding you down but to elevate it as symbol of quality for, accomplishment in, and
dedication to the dental laboratory industry,


Sincerely yours,

Tim Lane, CDT
 
hydent

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#12
Tim thanks for the responce, clearly it's a lable of competence in the dental laboratory field but beyond that what are the benefits? As I said before benefits besides the feel good factor. Also what is all entailed to keep that title? I have a friend who is a ceramist that sells his work for 4 to 5 times the average lab he was once a cdt and gave it up due to the hassle of keeping it and he doesn't regret it at all. mabe I'm just a non conformist but until I can see more benefits that come from it, I dont see the point. I have said before I'm not against it, I'm on the fence with the issue, leaning towards not getting it at this point. The price to get it seems a little steep as well considering the hoops you have to jump through to take the tests.
 
CYNOSURER

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#13
Gave it up due to the hassle?

There are only two hassles. Documenting your CE credits and writing the check.

Apparently, coming up with the funds for writing the check wouldn't have been a hassle, so I'm guessing it was the actual writing the check and putting it in the mail...though they will let you do it online with a credit card now, I believe.

I hope getting the CE credits weren't too much of a hassle...as that is the only other requirement (aside from not getting a felon conviction on a dental related charge). Documenting the CE credits used to be a bit of a hassle (still is if you do it with reading material),but with the system they have now it's fairly hassle free.

Perhaps he could elaborate on the 'hassle'?

Okay, I'm being a smart ass. I know it's a hassle. But it does keep us on our toes. It's easier to put off continuing education than to fit into our time schedule. What the NBC does, for me, is keep it on the schedule so I don't let one year turn into two then three then four. It's real easy to get stranded on these little islands we call laboratories. The web has given us a nice connection but those face to faces are priceless and I appreciate being compelled to do so. Just as I am thankful dentists are also compelled to attend and document their CE. It's a good system that deserves support. One of the reasons many trade show show a profit is because of the number of CDT's who are compelled into going to fulfill their 'hassle' of CE.
 
kcdt

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#14
the CDT requires you to meet educational standards yearly to keep the credential. Among these is the health and safety requirement, which is a requirement that EVERY credentialed worker in health care has to meet since the mid '90s following the CDC's guideline on infectious disease control.
This is an industry with rapidly changing technologies, and having educational requirements is one way of ensuring that you don't let the grind of "I'm too busy" get in the way of staying on top of the curve.
Several states have enacted laws that require a CDT to be in direct supervision over the production in that CDT's specialty. I know many people will always push back at what they see as government intrusion, consider that we make our own health care choices based on the training and certification the clinic holds for the procedure we need done. Technicians have often been treated with a total lack of professional respect by the dentist, and I don't see how we expect that to change any if we cannot muster up respect for the profession ourselves.
Can one be successful and make money without a CDT? Sure, but in the eyes of those (DMD,DDS,RDA,DA,EDDA) that must hold documentation to work and must improve it to move up, what does it say about our commitment to be the only one on the team with a mouth full of opinions and nothing else to back it up?
And what the hell is the big crime about taking pride in your career? Being proud of one's accomplishments is a great motivation in life and shouldn't be dismissed so easily.
If you don't see value in avenues for self improvement, fine, but you may have a hard time being taken more seriously than you're willing to take yourself.
 
hydent

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#15
It seems you guys may be getting a little defensive about this. I'm not asking you to defend your stance on the issue I'm just trying to learn the advantages and disadvantages for those of us whom do not have a cdt and are on the fence about it.
You said it yourself Ken that most dentists dont even know what cdt is how do you get respect for something that isn't that recognized in the dental profession? I agree that we as dental techs deserve something that is deserving of respect, is the cdt that something?
 
kcdt

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#16
I agree that we as dental techs deserve something that is deserving of respect, is the cdt that something?
Well, they now have the technologist designation that you can only earn by graduating from an accredited university, so I see that as an improvement, and who knows?, maybe some day that will be the only credentialed route.
Do I think the CDT is perfect? No, but for now its the only game in town in the US.
As far as value goes, well most of the major labs will pay CDT's more, offer them management positions faster, and encourage their employees to take steps on that journey.
I realize many of us are self employed, but what does it tell you that the big boys value it as a career step?
I'm sorry if I sounded defensive, but I think you overlook the value of doing something that places value on yourself even just for yourself. Not everything's about money, personal satisfaction can go a long way in life.
 
wwcanoer

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#17
I graduated from a two-year Dental Technology Program at a San Francisco Bay Area junior college in 1975, and was also required to obtain an A A degree. At that time, the instructor, strongly felt that within five to 10 years that all dental technicians would be required to get their initial training through a college -- technical program. If I remember correctly, 1975 was the first year that NADL started their Recognized Graduate (RG) program. The RG written exam was our final exam in the program. After working in in the field for three years, we were then eligible to take the CDT exams, both written and practical. I'm not sure, but if remember correctly, both exams were taken on the same day. When I started the program, enrollment was a maximum of 24 students, but by that time I graduated in two years, only 13 students made it all the way through. For our class, unfortunately, all seven of the students that had to drop out, were because of medical issues; a lot of car accidents, heart attack, and cancer. In 1978, when I took my CDT exams, there were two other students from my graduating class there. Unfortunately, I don't have any idea of how many of the original 13 students are still in the profession. Sometime in the late 1980s, the junior college dropped the Dental Technology Program. The reason? Entry pay was too low, just above minimum wage.

So that's a little bit of background information.

My personal view is that dental technicians should go through an accredited program, and earning some type of degree along with it. And after X number of practical experience years, then take the CDT exams.



Continuing education is a must! Do I feel like I get enough? No! Unfortunately, I think logistics is my excuse. We can't get lecturers to my community, because we don't have enough technicians in our county or the county to the north of us. To travel to a course, especially outside of Northern California, typically means two lost days of work. I've been in this business for over 30 years now, and still think there is so much that I don't know.

The biggest pitfall to our profession? Piece work, and assembly line job descriptions.

Okay, I'm getting off topic...

What's the benefit of being a CDT? Whatever you get out of it.

So that's my two cents worth
 
hydent

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#18
I graduated from a two-year Dental Technology Program at a San Francisco Bay Area junior college in 1975, and was also required to obtain an A A degree. At that time, the instructor, strongly felt that within five to 10 years that all dental technicians would be required to get their initial training through a college -- technical program. If I remember correctly, 1975 was the first year that NADL started their Recognized Graduate (RG) program. The RG written exam was our final exam in the program. After working in in the field for three years, we were then eligible to take the CDT exams, both written and practical. I'm not sure, but if remember correctly, both exams were taken on the same day. When I started the program, enrollment was a maximum of 24 students, but by that time I graduated in two years, only 13 students made it all the way through. For our class, unfortunately, all seven of the students that had to drop out, were because of medical issues; a lot of car accidents, heart attack, and cancer. In 1978, when I took my CDT exams, there were two other students from my graduating class there. Unfortunately, I don't have any idea of how many of the original 13 students are still in the profession. Sometime in the late 1980s, the junior college dropped the Dental Technology Program. The reason? Entry pay was too low, just above minimum wage.

So that's a little bit of background information.

My personal view is that dental technicians should go through an accredited program, and earning some type of degree along with it. And after X number of practical experience years, then take the CDT exams.



Continuing education is a must! Do I feel like I get enough? No! Unfortunately, I think logistics is my excuse. We can't get lecturers to my community, because we don't have enough technicians in our county or the county to the north of us. To travel to a course, especially outside of Northern California, typically means two lost days of work. I've been in this business for over 30 years now, and still think there is so much that I don't know.

The biggest pitfall to our profession? Piece work, and assembly line job descriptions.

Okay, I'm getting off topic...

What's the benefit of being a CDT? Whatever you get out of it.

So that's my two cents worth

Thanks for the reply and the backround, also thank you for being to the point about what the benefit to becoming a cdt is "whatever you get out of it" I think that may sum it up. I'm still interested to hear other peoples responces. Surely there are cdt's and non cdt's that have some input, I always see 20 or more people on the forum whenever I'm on here. Don't be shy jump on in with some input.
 
hydent

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#19
On second note who ever said non cdt's don't take ce credits I take my fair share every year more than many cdt's I know. I know I may be an exeption but I don't want to be pigeon holed into a group of non cdts that don't stay educated.
 
kcdt

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#20
On second note who ever said non cdt's don't take ce credits I take my fair share every year more than many cdt's I know. I know I may be an exeption but I don't want to be pigeon holed into a group of non cdts that don't stay educated.
Fair enough. Many of the prostho asso I belong to are dropping their standards because the workforce is disappearing and they've only now woken up to the problem. After the hurdles I got through to get in, I admit to having mixed feelings about that, but we are in crisis in the US.
I suspect that the best and brightest from the offshore labs make start trying to go the green card route to live and work and be citizens here. Maybe that will be the salvation of the US industry....
I've always wondered if the thing that kept the wages so low and killed off higher education in this field was that the military trained so many for so long... years and years of ex-GIs well trained, but without the economic necessity that universities saddle the civilians with....
It was like free manna from heaven and there were so many... well, you get the point.
The current attrition of the workforce has been driving up fees and wages here, but of course the offshore market does cut into that.... that is until those countries wind up with a real middle class with real expectations, and then their economic model will change or the workers will leave for better pastures.
For the sake of those who follow us, I hope we can elevate this profession to the level of respect it deserves.
 
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