All New Versamill 5X500 and 5X500L with Loader

brayks

brayks

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Now available the all new Versamill 5X500 ($69,500) and 5X500L loader ($86,500)

Check 'em out...


MachineWithDentureBackground.jpg OverallImageRendering.JPG
 
Holy

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Cast aluminium-alloy frame, how reliable this in long term accuracy?

vs imes icore granite frame or polymer concrete frame
 
brayks

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All are very good machine bases and contribute to reduced vibration.
Cast aluminum-alloy has proven to be extremely reliable in terms of long term accuracy, reliability, and functionality.
Between the three, you will find little difference specifically with our frame due to the "bracing" used in the castings themselves.
The biggest reason granite composites and concrete polymers are utilized is the cost associated as compared to a cast material. (BTW solid granite is a no go)
Cast material requires precision machining of important, mating surfaces and heat treating/normalization which adds to the expense.
Without going into the details and FEM analysis typically used in the design process, the result, with properly designed and "braced" castings (as with the Versamill) is typically lighter machine bases with proven, excellent vibration reducing and heat-dissipating characteristics—over the long term.
 
CoolHandLuke

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imes's use of granite is not well thought out.

when we broke the x axis on a 650i the solid granite X/Y/Z angled base had to be smashed in order to access and remove that axis and a new granite slab had to be shipped along with a new x axis. the 650 is also well underpowered for its quoted capabilities.

cast aluminum or steel frames carry enough weight that either material would do just fine, but aluminum is cheaper to cast and in dental machines it can be one piece instead of several bolted pieces as below.



these machines use a lot of the same basic principles; heavy frame with ball screws for precision motion that holds accuracy over time.
 
brayks

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Yep, as I mentioned, solid granite....not good!
BTW, weight alone (while important) is not the only measure. With proper "bracing" resulting from FEM analysis (example image below) and experience, weight (and corresponding cost) can be reduced while still maintaining excellent vibration reduction and heat dissipation characteristics. Below is image of a Versamill cast aluminum-alloy frame.
perspective view (4).jpg C%20Frame%20ISO%20Displacement.jpg
 

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Holy

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imes's use of granite is not well thought out.

when we broke the x axis on a 650i the solid granite X/Y/Z angled base had to be smashed in order to access and remove that axis and a new granite slab had to be shipped along with a new x axis. the 650 is also well underpowered for its quoted capabilities.

cast aluminum or steel frames carry enough weight that either material would do just fine, but aluminum is cheaper to cast and in dental machines it can be one piece instead of several bolted pieces as below.



these machines use a lot of the same basic principles; heavy frame with ball screws for precision motion that holds accuracy over time.

That is a terrible design. i thought 650i would be trouble free. how reliable the machine? and what you meant by underpowering?

thank you
 
CoolHandLuke

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if you stick to your plastics and zirconias, the 650 will do fine. you try milling hard metals though, you quickly find out what its made of. it may look big tough and strong but it vibrates like all f**k.

comes with standard 1/4" end mill holders - but don't even try to add a tool greater than 4mm to it, there simply ins't enough torque to run it effectively. 2kw spindle don't mean you always have 2kw on hand; but they won't provide you the power curve diagram to show you where the torque peaks.
 
Holy

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if you stick to your plastics and zirconias, the 650 will do fine. you try milling hard metals though, you quickly find out what its made of. it may look big tough and strong but it vibrates like all f**k.

comes with standard 1/4" end mill holders - but don't even try to add a tool greater than 4mm to it, there simply ins't enough torque to run it effectively. 2kw spindle don't mean you always have 2kw on hand; but they won't provide you the power curve diagram to show you where the torque peaks.
That is a big disappointment from the actual user since I am eyeing on imes icore. thank you for sharing your experience. I have to change my plan.
 
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