About 3D printer

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LarryRDC

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<<Which scanner do u have? >>

Mcteeth, I have a Medit Hybrid w/ 3-axis arm ( Which I believe has evolved into the newerT500, which has larger cameras and is a little faster)
I use their scanner software (Collab) and Exocad. It can also put stl files for 3Shape format as well.
 
JayH

JayH

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Printing denture base, film is not supported in center. Large cross sections cause stress in center, result in tearing of film.
Yeah that's weird, especially since there is no peel associated with this printer's operation - the physical part is never in contact with the membrane.
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

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Jay! havent seen you for a while, how u been man
 
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crapshoot

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Flashforge Hunter from me.... a very very good copy of asiga max... at reasonable price

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Hi Kostisg, I am interested in the Flashforge Hunter 3D printer. You're the only one who's mentioned this printer on here so far. Can I trouble you for more information about it? Like what kind of prints do you do? Have you had any problems with it? Which resins do you use. Plus any other opinions you may want to share about it would be great. You can also PM me if you prefer. Thank you.
 
Mike2

Mike2

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any ball park price on the nextdent printer? thanks in advance
 
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grantoz

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i have had an asiga max for few months now its been faultless and support has been great. have a look at the forums on facebook you will see im not the only one who has had this experience.
 
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Brandon Patrick

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As far as saving time goes, this all depends on how many models you are pouring vs the build platform size and x,y,z print deminsions (Not to mention scanner speed, building the model design file, and how fast you can nest models). We're talking roughly 10 minutes (give or take a few minutes) from scan to nest per case (then post print cleaning as CoolHandLuke pointed out). Printing models may not turn out to be faster start to finish compared to pouring, but it does free you up to work on other things while they print (which honestly isn't a whole lot longer than waiting for stone to set up).
As for the fit, most people that go model-less use a printed model for establishing interproximal contacts because the crowns won't seat properly. I would be worried that manufacturing crowns directly on a printed model would result in a ill fitting crown at delivery. Stone deals with expansion, whereas print resin deals with shrinkage rates. Unless these issues have been resolved in the last few months and I'm out of the loop.. I wouldn't believe every word the rep is telling you. Many people have bought printers in the past that end up not being what they hoped.
If you were to come up with other reasons to buy a printer besides just the printed models then it could be worth the investment. I don't want to sound discouraging but the hype of 3D printers and digital tech causes us to buy based on emotion when it may not be a good fit. I just don't know of anyone buying a printer just for models (other than high production labs).. it's more of an additional feature than a primary use if that makes sense.
If you do continue to get a printer though I hear great feedback about the Asiga Max from everyone who uses this. It's open system and has precise Z print resolution (1 micron). The Kulzer doesn't look bad either but has a minimum Z resolution of 30 microns... which may not matter for the most part on models, but might make a difference later if you want to print crowns, bridges, etc. I probably wouldn't go with the Structo. It's more expensive and closed system. It seems best suited for printing models, but you could buy 2 of the other ones for that price. Print models in one and restorations in the other.. If it was me buying right now, I would go Asiga Max.
 
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grantoz

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brandon patrick you print models because how else are you going to get something to work on when you get a digital scan from the dentist which is happening more and more every day.this is fine with me the digital scans are better 95% of the time than i would get from rubber impressions from my dentists its advisable to get a printer that is truely sorted so you can start printing great models straight away when this happens you you shake your head and just wish that you had this tech years ago ,life is much simpler when you use these beautiful models.
 
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Brandon Patrick

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brandon patrick you print models because how else are you going to get something to work on when you get a digital scan from the dentist which is happening more and more every day.this is fine with me the digital scans are better 95% of the time than i would get from rubber impressions from my dentists its advisable to get a printer that is truely sorted so you can start printing great models straight away when this happens you you shake your head and just wish that you had this tech years ago ,life is much simpler when you use these beautiful models.
Of course that's why we print models.. I'm not saying it's not valuable. For small labs who don't have a large volume of models to push through the printer, is it worth thousands of dollars to purchase a cool piece of equipment just to have it (especially if your docs aren't investing in an IO scanner)? Not to mention those who look around and could use that money to replace any given thing in their lab. The question asked was whether it saves time and is more efficient to scan impressions, not receiving digital scans.. As for cost per model, with die stone you're looking at roughly 30 cents per model (at 100g of stone per model),about 20 cents per stone articulation, and 10 minutes of actual work involved pouring and articulating at $20/hr you're looking a total of about $4 total cost... and the only exaggeration I made was average model techs making $20/hr. Printing hollow models with a cheaper resin will cost that much per arch, before adding in (an exaggerated) $20/hr pay for a scan tech. If you're outsourcing for printed models then I certainly see how that cost can motivate one to invest in a printer. I can't even address the quality of impressions because that will vary by doc, but stone models can be beautiful too :p I'm just presenting another perspective and hopefully anyone making this kind of purchase would consider every aspect.

(I feel it's necessary to state that I'm not against 3D printers or any technology for that matter.. I am against making unwise and irresponsible decisions, which we all could agree that millennials (like myself) prove most capable of.)

#stonemodelsmatter
 
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grantoz

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hi brandon i agree that pouring models in stone for rubber impression is the cheapest way to go .but when i use bredent model resin for a full arch or an implant model at 15 dollars a go single use its not so clear cut.especially when you add the gum replica and the techs time to do all this. the other thing i find very cost effective is when you want to make a geller model with removable dies the printed models are much cheaper and better quality over all. i had a similar view to yours a couple of years back but i was forced to look at printing and milling models because my clients were starting to get ios 's and i was starting to loose clients' owning a printer has turned that around. i picked up 3 new clients yesterday which was great because i flicked an old 5hitty rubber impression guy who was endless remakes.i get that you have dentists that dont want to go digital but being ready when they do is very important. great to talk to you .regards grantoz if you have any questions about printers dont hesitate to message me.
 
cadfan

cadfan

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I see a Hunter by Flashforge next to it. Can anybody comment on that one? It's hard to find reviews on it for dental applications. Thanks.
no rewiews no real dent application crap constructed vat ignorant and partially resistant to advice . A beamer makes no dent application they start now changing their software but thats only one point of a long list . If you want to print only one application maybe !!!
 
2oothguy

2oothguy

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We looked into the printer option but it wont save you any time in my book. We just pour a check die and then a solid and that has been the fastest way for us so far. I still would not mind getting a printer for doing some diagnostic case planing and to use on a few of those drs that are sending scans. But it would take forever to make it worth while. It takes a special dr to give me a impression that I feel good about just scanning it and having something that is going to fit. Its bumpy road and you better make sure there on board with this trial run with you, otherwise its by by doc.
 
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Chus81

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[QUOTE = "irod22, post: 292699, miembro: 19202"] Vaya a Moonray, más rápido que form2 y más versátil. [/ QUOTE]


Completely agree
 
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