3SHAPE Emax CAD Inlay/Onlay settings.

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sirmorty

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Does anyone have any settings they could share that they use for EMax Cad inlay settings.

Milling these have been a bit of a pain for me.

I find that the sprue has to be way to big in order for it to not fall off when milling.

And the thickness of the margin so it doesn't chip while milling makes for a lot of adjustments in the blue state. and it's pretty tough to get a tool in the areas on the occlusal margin.

Has anyone had any success with milling these?

I feel like I'm just wasting time/material.

Milling on a Versa Mill 5XS.
 
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Foggy_in_RI

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Milled emax inlays and onlays were always problematic for us (and we had a production center quality $500K mill). We ended up moving over to pressing them instead and saved a lot of time and $$.

The mill was capable until the first time it was crashed. Even after having the manufacturer come in and recertify the machine the emax products became more challenging. Hindsight is 20/20- situation gave us more capacity for Ti products.
 
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sirmorty

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Thanks for the reply.
I'm using new tools and it still doesn't make a smooth margin. Mill is calibrated.
It's not really acceptable in my opinion, Could be the way it's nested but you are very limited by where you can place the sprue.

Hard to justify doing them when an Emax block cost so much.
I'm thinking of just out sourcing them. But I would prefer to get pressed ones if possible.
 
Brett Hansen CDT

Brett Hansen CDT

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Thanks for the reply.
I'm using new tools and it still doesn't make a smooth margin. Mill is calibrated.
It's not really acceptable in my opinion, Could be the way it's nested but you are very limited by where you can place the sprue.

Hard to justify doing them when an Emax block cost so much.
I'm thinking of just out sourcing them. But I would prefer to get pressed ones if possible.
We print our veneers and inlays and then press them. We have Ivoclar's PM7 mill, but we don't mill any emax.
 
MoosetheGoose

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agree with the guy who said to press them. Though if milling, when using the connect to margin line, i believe the first number is the thickness of the margin, change it up to like .2 or .3 even, overbulk it near the margin, and have the ceramist take it back after its been sintered. I wouldnt even mess with it in green state those things are so small and fragile... If youre really having a tough time with spruing then choose a spot on like the buccal or something and make a arch with either attachments or the add tool, and use that to sprue too. Itll require bringing it back in green state though..... both these suggestions are kinda overkill though
 
MoosetheGoose

MoosetheGoose

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also calibrate your mill and make sure the burs have a decent amount of life left in them.
 
MoosetheGoose

MoosetheGoose

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plus isnt emax better for low retention cases anyways? just press it
 
Pronto

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Even pressing they still can be very challenging...
 
Car 54

Car 54

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I'm with the rest of the press crowd. The margins come out better when pressed, at least from what I've heard. Let alone you can probably press more units at less cost with an ingot, than milling a block.
 

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