3D printer for crown and bridge models

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macombdentalceramics

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Hello lab techs, looking for an accurate printer for crown and bridge models , any suggestions?
 
JMN

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well, if you're asking this, you will need solid support.
So, find out who has the best support that will either come to you or give you a loaner and/or print for you if yours goes down.

Think of this like a porcelain furnace and being taught how to use it over the phone. And the porcelain is only good for that type furnace.

so Supplier/Support first.

Then what tech type? Do you want smooth rounded edges at cost of repatable accuracy anywhere on the bed? Form.

Do you want something that will alwasy be within like 50 microns, repeatalbe anywhere on the bed, but never really smooth? DLP vat. Which is mostly everyone else.

The tech is sound for both, but they best serve differnet needs.

Unless I missed something, which is always a possiblity
 
LuthorCorp

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You have to test out different resins, you can get an acceptable result with almost any of the printers, it just depends on how you make your models and what tolerances you are looking to hit. You have a lot of the mid range printers (Asiga, SprintRay, Rapidshape) that do a good job but you need to test and narrow down your recipe and procedures.

No printer will work out the box for C&B models unless you are going with one of the high end printers (Stratasys J5 for example) but even then if you don't have your settings dialed in it will most likely still require leg work.
 
npdynamite

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I will second JMN in saying look for Supplier/support first. Someone could recommend something, but it could be printer specific and if that's not a printer you have good supplier for it won't be very helpful. I would try to pick a supplier you trust that has a couple printer options and see which their customers are having better success with. Maybe see if you can talk to a customer. Most printers from what I've seen will have their own model material and you may have access to a few others depending on which printer you get. Getting a printer that you have good support for will be your fastest route to quality models regardless of which printer and resin you get
 
rkm rdt

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Man that printed is locked in materials wise.
Guess that's ok if that's what your looking for.
It's not toxic either. That resin crap is a mess to deal with.
It still may be early for filament printers but it looks encouraging especially for just models.
 
npdynamite

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I could be completely off here, so someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but haven't filament printers been widely available the longest? I don't feel like this is where we are going to see the technology advance. I would expect resin printing to become easier and cheaper
 
rkm rdt

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I could be completely off here, so someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but haven't filament printers been widely available the longest? I don't feel like this is where we are going to see the technology advance. I would expect resin printing to become easier and cheaper
The filaments were never accurate enough and not specific to dental. This is why the Renfert printer caught my eye.
Again, they may not be accurate for anything other than models but I think there could be an advantage to using one.
 
npdynamite

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Yep, I've never seen that style printing done in a way that would work for margins. I can see the appeal of a low impact unit like that for a small lab that needs to be printing models, so I certainly don't dislike the idea. I've worked with Stratosys and Carbon and they both have pretty involved cleanup processes that it would be nice to not have to deal with
 
rkm rdt

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Yep, I've never seen that style printing done in a way that would work for margins. I can see the appeal of a low impact unit like that for a small lab that needs to be printing models, so I certainly don't dislike the idea. I've worked with Stratosys and Carbon and they both have pretty involved cleanup processes that it would be nice to not have to deal with
Is 50 microns accurate enough for margins ?
 
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I agree that Renfert makes some great products. I would like to see the prints.
Do you know how much it sells for?
 
npdynamite

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Is 50 microns accurate enough for margins ?
I would imagine that it is technically accurate enough. I don't know the number on what is considered to be clinically acceptable, but I also don't tend to use the standard of clinically acceptable, because I think we can do better than that minimum. My comment had less to do with the number given for accuracy and more to do with the way filament prints appear (once again, in my relatively limited experience and of course I have never seen this printer in action) The prints I have seen you can see more "separation" between layers in a sense. for example, if two layers of filament cross a margin you will have slight indention between them that you could feel. They could have figured this out on this printer but I would guess not. Will this compromise the final result? probably not but I wouldn't want to work on models like that.

Again, this is pure conjecture base on former filament printers, not the one in question. I'll reserve judgement till I see one in person, but this is the type of thing I would not purchase without some hands on experience first
 
rkm rdt

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I would imagine that it is technically accurate enough. I don't know the number on what is considered to be clinically acceptable, but I also don't tend to use the standard of clinically acceptable, because I think we can do better than that minimum. My comment had less to do with the number given for accuracy and more to do with the way filament prints appear (once again, in my relatively limited experience and of course I have never seen this printer in action) The prints I have seen you can see more "separation" between layers in a sense. for example, if two layers of filament cross a margin you will have slight indention between them that you could feel. They could have figured this out on this printer but I would guess not. Will this compromise the final result? probably not but I wouldn't want to work on models like that.

Again, this is pure conjecture base on former filament printers, not the one in question. I'll reserve judgement till I see one in person, but this is the type of thing I would not purchase without some hands on experience first
I see your concerns if you are making crowns from the print. However if the accuracy is determined by the scan and mill then it should suffice for the task of checking contacts and occlusion. I'm not a fan of modeless crowns yet I've got the cad down pretty good to get an accurate result.
I think that if the cleanup and extra equipment that comes with resin printers could be avoided and you get good accuracy ( models only),then its worth looking into. Renfert's name is on the line here so it will be interesting to see where this goes. Yes price will be important as well.
 
npdynamite

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Good point. I'm curious and skeptical. I can definitely see the application for a small lab working predominately from intra oral scans. A low hassle model to check contacts and occlusion would be great.
 
CoolHandLuke

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i haven't been very impressed by Nextdent

and i developed a severe alergic reaction to resin so i have stopped being a fan of resin printing.
 

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