3D printed immediate denture

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pRehm

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Our first wearable 3D printed denture (it’s not the most beautiful as it is for an immediate) patient will wear this during healing, and when ready we will redesign and mill out the final denture on a PM7 mill

Scanned with trios
Designed on 3-Shape
Printed using Asiga Max, and dentca denture resins
 

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JJmarquez702

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Great Job! Was the impression taken with an intraoral digital scanner?
 
Affinity

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Whats your cost for one of these?
 
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pRehm

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In Canada there aren't too many approved resins for intra-oral use yet so the ones available are still a little pricey, the nice thing is the Asiga software lets you input the price of a Liter of material and tells you the total cost of the print, this one was printed in two parts and cost us around $25 in total material costs
 
Affinity

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Thats great to know, sounds very useful to know how much your material cost is although I guess theyre close to the same size.
 
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grantoz

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why do people consider other printers the asiga just kills it for frick sake. when you read about the stuffing around on the trialing a new printer thread and then you come to this thread where you see a whole denture printed no real problems using what ever resin you want and then it calculates the material cost for you as well. shut up and take my money,oh they already did.
 
CoolHandLuke

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Not all asigas were created equal grant. The little red ones take long and arent super great. The bigger orange ones cost a lot. Like roland and 3dsystems it would seem theres one model in the entire catalogue that actually works well. Much to the chagrin of the participants in our field.
 
Affinity

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asiga max runs about 14k? is that right?
 
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grantoz

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funny on the user forums for asiga there doesnt seem to be many complaints .audiology and jewellery used all of gods asigas without to many problems does it just mean that we dont know what we are doing? big companies like tiffany, thomas sabo and the hearing aid guys with big volumes .i looked at this as well before buying my asiga as they had been using 3d printers way longer than dental.
 
CoolHandLuke

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funny on the user forums for asiga there doesnt seem to be many complaints .audiology and jewellery used all of gods asigas without to many problems does it just mean that we dont know what we are doing? big companies like tiffany, thomas sabo and the hearing aid guys with big volumes .i looked at this as well before buying my asiga as they had been using 3d printers way longer than dental.
Well the jewellery guys only deal in metals which if are misprinted can be fixed with some solder and a snip. Its an industry built on standard sizing and patterned settings. 100um misprinted clasp sockets can be hammered and closed without issue. Dental misprints cant be so easily fixed. What can be fixed takes a lot of time to diagnose and fix due to the meticulous nature of our industry's techs. We'd rater not have to grind emax or metal as it can be a lot of time and material over time. Not nearly so costly in jewelery.

At least thats how i see it.
 
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grantoz

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and the hearing aid guys they dont want misprints they want the parts that go inside to fit as well. with comercial jewellery they cast hinges set stones they like good fits as well. ive taught a few how to cast believe me they like accurate as much as anybody.the point is the asigas work not just one model like your saying as they have been used on large production industries for quite a while now sure the smaller one is a bit slower but hey you get what you pay for.
 
JMN

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Difference between jewlery and dentistry is that nobody in jewlery cares if the print is 20 microns off. We do.
Prongs are tightened all the time. Rings are sized all the time.
Hearing aids go into soft tissue, as long as they are smooth, and reasonably close they are fine.
Teeth aren't soft, sized, or tightened. Implant misses the screwchannel it's a failure.

I like you Grant, but it is 3 different industries using the same process. No one compares a bone drill to a concrete drill even though they both cut rotationally. They have different materials, different drill bits, and different needs.
 
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grantoz

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sure i totally agree with you JMN, the point im trying to make and obviously not very well is ..when i first looked at our industry for a printer really the only thing around that most of us could afford was a formlab that wasnt good enough for c+b models or the other way was going to cost me a hundred grand for again not a great result.so i started looking at other industries to see what they were using.just like dental companies do when they look to develop cnc mills' rolland started by making musical instruments with cnc mills again very different but it was a start.this is where i started to consider my asiga printer and guess what all that practice in other industries turns out a good printer in dental.so again the point im trying make is we are very busy guys that need time to make our crowns we dont need to reinvent the wheel and if we do good on you all. ive also seen some very good jewelers become very good dental techs and vice versa, i learnt how to solder and forge stuff when i did silver smithing for 2 years .i believe trying to muck around with really cheep hobby printers is going to cost you a lot in the long run .would you go to a dentist or a dental tech that was using a dremell instead of a decent handpeice. a good quality printer no longer going to cost you and arm or a leg any more . Buying a good printer was one of the best investments of my long career i get great models everyday no bubbles great bites great contact points and peace of mind that my tech hasnt distorted the impression by doing what some techs do .the whole process just saves time its as important to our lab as a good furnace is.
 
JMN

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sure i totally agree with you JMN, the point im trying to make and obviously not very well is ..when i first looked at our industry for a printer really the only thing around that most of us could afford was a formlab that wasnt good enough for c+b models or the other way was going to cost me a hundred grand for again not a great result.so i started looking at other industries to see what they were using.just like dental companies do when they look to develop cnc mills' rolland started by making musical instruments with cnc mills again very different but it was a start.this is where i started to consider my asiga printer and guess what all that practice in other industries turns out a good printer in dental.so again the point im trying make is we are very busy guys that need time to make our crowns we dont need to reinvent the wheel and if we do good on you all. ive also seen some very good jewelers become very good dental techs and vice versa, i learnt how to solder and forge stuff when i did silver smithing for 2 years .i believe trying to muck around with really cheep hobby printers is going to cost you a lot in the long run .would you go to a dentist or a dental tech that was using a dremell instead of a decent handpeice. a good quality printer no longer going to cost you and arm or a leg any more . Buying a good printer was one of the best investments of my long career i get great models everyday no bubbles great bites great contact points and peace of mind that my tech hasnt distorted the impression by doing what some techs do .the whole process just saves time its as important to our lab as a good furnace is.
I'll stand beside you on that expansion.

I and others like the idea of the cheap hobby printers to learn. And once you learn enough you can make them quite profitable. It's pay now or pay later, like so many other things. "Sweat equity". Some have more time, some have more money. Some have neither :)

We have lost so much knowledge in effectively becoming appliance operators and the surge in interest of the how and why makes me feel all warm and hopeful.
 
Flippercentral

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Never mind lol.
 
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dandyfop

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Asiga Max is the best printer hands down in that price range. I just bought my second one and don't regret a single penny. Sure it would be great if it was 5k, but the thing is open source and has been an absolute pleasure to run.
 
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implantguy

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Our first wearable 3D printed denture (it’s not the most beautiful as it is for an immediate) patient will wear this during healing, and when ready we will redesign and mill out the final denture on a PM7 mill

Scanned with trios
Designed on 3-Shape
Printed using Asiga Max, and dentca denture resins
You located in St. Albert per chance?
 

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