3D Dental Printer vs. 3D Printers

Bryce Hiller

Bryce Hiller

Well-Known Member
Full Member
Why cant we use a regular 3D printer? There are really nice desktop printers for 1,000 vs. 18-19,000 ones for dental labs?
There aren't any "really nice" desktop printers for $1000 for dental applications.
 
denturist-student

denturist-student

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Check out the Phrozen shuffle XL which is being used for complete dentures by Ivory Digital dentures of Toronto....
https://ultimate3dprintingstore.com/collections/phrozen-make-resin-3d-printer/products/phrozen-shuffle-xl-bundle-package
https://www.ivorydigitaldenture.com/

The Phrozen printer goes for about 1500 - 2000. and is supposed to be good enough for dental with a 10 micron resolution.
Not as fast as the Nextdent 5100 but for a tabletop printer may just do the trick.

We are soon going to a fully digital print format up here in Edmonton and one of the first denture clinics to do so.
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

40% titanium
Staff member
Full Member
uh, how exactly do you plan on denturing with that thing they only have resin for ortho, guide, tray, model. none for denture base, none for teeth. i'm 99.8% sure if i check HC MDALL i won't see them listed.
 
denturist-student

denturist-student

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uh, how exactly do you plan on denturing with that thing they only have resin for ortho, guide, tray, model. none for denture base, none for teeth. i'm 99.8% sure if i check HC MDALL i won't see them listed.
they are not a closed printer and will use the Nextdent resins.
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

40% titanium
Staff member
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Read some reviews of the Phrozen. Doesnt sound like adding resin profile for nextdent will be so simple.
 
PCDL

PCDL

Active Member
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consulted with our 3D REP's. This is the current information that we have. Sherrie says you are free to contact her.

With 3D printing dentures this is how it works:

You cannot buy an open materials printer and just plug in a “510k” denture base resin and FDA compliant. In order to be FDA compliant you must follow a complete system. A complete system consists of the following: Printer + Resin + High Intensity Light curing unit. If you choose to go “outside of the box” you will NOT be FDA compliant.



Right now we are in the process of qualifying the Asiga Max and Pro2 printers with the Dentca resin which has it’s 510k. We have to go through a process to show that our printers will accurately and print their resin under certain guidelines using a specific high intensity light curing unit to bond the teeth. This will be complete by the end of February.



So a few examples:



If you have a Cara printer, you must use the Dima (Dentca private labeled) denture base resin and their high intensity curing unit to bond the teeth into the base in order to be FDA compliant. If you go outside of that approved system you can be fined by the FDA.



If you have a Carbon printer, you must use the Carbon (Dentca private labeled) denture base resin and their high intensity curing unit. Again if you go outside of that approved system you can be fined by the FDA.



Please note that as of right now… the NextDent resin does not have a 510k. Their resin is only classified as biocompatible Class IIa which only counts in Europe… not the States. So all of these people buying up NextDent printers to 3D print dentures are going to be disappointed.



Clear as mud?



PS…. Feel free to copy and paste my response as I am not on this message board. You can give my cell or email address to anyone that wants to reach out to me to discuss this topic







Sherri Weatherby

Territory Sales Manager

Whip Mix Corporation

Dental Technology Solutions

800-626-5651 ext. 1425

502-235-3182 cell
[email protected]

whipmix.com
So let me throw this into the Mix.... What If I used the B9Creations 530 printer vs. the CARA printer??
If this post seems like it makes no sense, google the two printers. $5000 or so difference.
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

40% titanium
Staff member
Full Member
Mitsui chemicals owns both companies B9 and Kulzer. So factor that in.
 
Adi

Adi

Active Member
Full Member
I've been reading on feedback for 3d printers, I think my mind is set to buy one of these two types :
Phrozen shuffle
Anycube photon
The fda approval is not an issue here, so which one would you recommend?

My main work on 3d printer is provisional for implant cases, and Models for training purposes.
And maybe some printed wax for casting metal.

I have never used one before, so I would appreciate any suggestions.
 
Wainwright

Wainwright

Active Member
Full Member
So let me throw this into the Mix.... What If I used the B9Creations 530 printer vs. the CARA printer??
If this post seems like it makes no sense, google the two printers. $5000 or so difference.
The only difference is what was validated by the resin manufacturer listed on their quality system and the instructions for use. Like all regulated products its very specific on the equipment and process used to make the final product. Even though you are technically correct if they list the Kulzer printer and not the B9 in the IFU and documentation its an incorrect usage and in turn breaking its biocompatiblily in the eyes of regulators. It would be the same if in the IFU they list their Hi-light UV cure unit (I think thats what its called) and not general light frequency and timing, if you don't use their UV cure light indicated you are breaking protocol thus losing its approval for human use.

Check the instructions for use or IFU for the resin in question and see what the requirements are, its typically; the specific 3D printer, print settings, wash system or requirements, and UV curing unit or settings.

Burnout
 
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