3D Dental Printer vs. 3D Printers

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Lindsay Patterson

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Why cant we use a regular 3D printer? There are really nice desktop printers for 1,000 vs. 18-19,000 ones for dental labs?
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

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theres nothing stopping you except the quality of the prints. you'll want a printer that can print very fine details if you ever intend to use the print for burnout on say an emax, pfm, or gold unit. you need fine details for accurate margins at least. same goes for dies, you need the details to get clean die models, and positionally accurate implants.

so most printers under 5000$ simply don't cut the mustard.
 
Glenn Kennedy

Glenn Kennedy

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Speed, accuracy, dental specific materials and ease of use are the limiting factors in the low cost printers.
 
S

sirmorty

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I'm just speaking on Models.

The only problem is that you can't really tell a difference when it comes to dental models.

Yeah the desktop printers are slow but you can have a few of them going if you have the volume for a fraction of the price on an expensive ones.

As cool as those Carbon printers are. I just can't see the ROI for your average Dental lab.

And to be honest the only time the Doc will actually looks to the model is when things aren't going right in the chair.
 
rkm rdt

rkm rdt

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I'm just speaking on Models.

The only problem is that you can't really tell a difference when it comes to dental models.

Yeah the desktop printers are slow but you can have a few of them going if you have the volume for a fraction of the price on an expensive ones.

As cool as those Carbon printers are. I just can't see the ROI for your average Dental lab.

And to be honest the only time the Doc will actually looks to the model is when things aren't going right in the chair.
or when she's applying for the hygenist position :cool:
 
HygienicBee

HygienicBee

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If you don't want to rip your hair out after countless failed prints you're gonna want to cough up some dough, just don't get eyes bigger than you're wallet
 
JayH

JayH

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Why not head over to the local jeweler the next time you need a crown, or an RPD cast? That way you can save on all the equipment and personnel.


But, I jest. :)
 
L

LarryRDC

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I know a fellow lab tech that bought a really cheap table top printer about the same time I got my 5100 (6 weeks ago.) I was printing models the day I set it up.
He has yet to get a model printed.....just sayen'
 
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grantoz

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i thought models are the most important bit.
 
L

LarryRDC

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Yep, models are important.They absolutely are if you’re pouring and scanning them. That’s where you start . But if you’re receiving IOS or scanning impressions, it’s reversed.. the model is the end at the end of the line. All you’re accuracy is determined in the scan and software design before the model is printed. Of course it’s definitely nice to have something accurately printed to check contacts and occlusion. And, with dedicated printer if you decide you want to print c&b, castables, or denture bases you’re good to go ;)
 
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grantoz

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i will still stand by models are the most important bit i print them
 
L

Lindsay Patterson

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It just didn't seem necessary to purchase one of these extremely high priced "dental" printers when the regular desktop printers are so much more affordable. As long as it has decent software, the process is the same right?! Just transfer the file and print? I went to a course a while ago by Mark Jackson and he had like 10 regular printers so it got me thinking maybe there is something to that. Regular desktop printers are incredibly accurate. I am just not understanding what is so special about dental printers.
 
CoolHandLuke

CoolHandLuke

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well, yes.

but if you don't want to be caught with your pants down you will need to ensure the hardware you use to print MODELS (if you print models) has class 2 certification for medical devices, because otherwise you might have a bit of a problem on your hands if someone found out and raised a stink.

just FYI: https://www.fda.gov/medicaldevices/productsandmedicalprocedures/3dprintingofmedicaldevices/default.htm

http://www.3ders.org/articles/20181126-materialise-validates-ultimaker-s5-stratasys-3d-printers-for-patient-specific-anatomical-models.html
 
JayH

JayH

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The only statement on either of those two pages that I could find that comes close to what I perceived you were saying is:

"In 2017, the FDA announced that software intended to create output files for 3D printing patient-specific anatomical models, which are used for diagnostic purposes, is considered a class II medical device and requires regulatory clearance." And that was basically an ad for Materialise / Stratasys.

Got any link to specific regulatory language, on a regulatory body's web site, that might indicate that model printers need a certain certification?
 
Wainwright

Wainwright

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The cost difference between consumer and industrial printers has been rapidly getting smaller over the past few years. Just think if you were in the market 5 years ago the most accurate printers were polyjet type technology with super high maintenance with a 75k+ price tag. It's amazing how far its come.

That being said working with a 3D printing company that is focused on the dental industry needs is paramount. You do not want to save a couple bucks to spend hours pulling out your hair. There are many great options for dental labs today that are affordable.
 
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